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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Getting ready to tackle the valves and other 18k service items on my 2017 SDGT. I have a few questions.

1) For the valves, I'm going to get the bolt I found listed in another thread to hold crank at TDC. I'm assuming this bolt is necessary?

2) For break line/fluid change, if I don't have the special reservoir and pump, will the system still flush without bungling up the ABS system? I imagine doing it without the tool will leave only a little oil fluid in the ABS pump that will mix with the new? Any issues doing it this way so long as I'd doesn't run dry? Vague/spongy brakes?

3) Aside from air filter/plug replacement, the only other thing that jumps out at me in the service schedule is SAS "membrane" change. Is this actually a wear item? Will performance/function be hindered if I don't do it, or is this simply an environmental thing? Also, I can't find "SAS membrane" on the fiche but where it appears to be located in the service manual it seems the fiche lists "red valve"; are those the same thing?

4) Any other tips before I dive in?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Oh, and has anyone been fortunate enough to find valves still in spec at 18k? I've found some other threads where it seems they were close, but still out just a touch.
 

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Bleeding brakes: It’s no different to bleeding a cars brakes. The pressure bleeding tool/approach makes it easy and almost fool proof to do, especially with small reservoirs on bikes. But it can be done manually like a car.

What you can’t do is the ABS bleed, as you need software to trigger it via the diagnostic port. But unless you have air in the system, you may not need to. The ABS bleed cycles the abs pump to “shake loose” small air bubbles that can stick to the valves in the ABS pump.

if your brakes are fine and you simply want to renew your fluid, a manual bleed will be fine, just be careful to try and not let the reservoirs run dry and get air in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pull the SAS canister, throw it away. See Rottweiler Performance for more info.
Saw their site today and started watching the vid. Are there performance gains to be had? Will it throw a code? Any drawbacks or hampering to the engine without fueling?

10mm shim kit, feelers, spark plugs, filters, wheel nut socket, new chain/sprocket, tires, rear stand, 250lb torque wrench, breaker bars, brake fluid, oil all on order. It was a pricey day, but probably not much more than having the service done at the dealer without the new tires and chain. I'm perfectly capable and I get some new tools to go with. Win.

Is there a gasket kit? Or is the rubber cover gasket reusable?

Bleeding brakes: It’s no different to bleeding a cars brakes. The pressure bleeding tool/approach makes it easy and almost fool proof to do, especially with small reservoirs on bikes. But it can be done manually like a car.

What you can’t do is the ABS bleed, as you need software to trigger it via the diagnostic port. But unless you have air in the system, you may not need to. The ABS bleed cycles the abs pump to “shake loose” small air bubbles that can stick to the valves in the ABS pump.

if your brakes are fine and you simply want to renew your fluid, a manual bleed will be fine, just be careful to try and not let the reservoirs run dry and get air in.
So will the dirty and the new then all get mixed up? Meaning if I flush a few times will it eventually all be clean? Or does what is in the ABS unit stay there?
 

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So will the dirty and the new then all get mixed up? Meaning if I flush a few times will it eventually all be clean? Or does what is in the ABS unit stay there?
I don’t know the answer to your question specifically As I’ve never worked on, nor designed an ABS pump. But I’ve flushed and replaced the brake fluid in my Kawasaki ZX-10R ABS 4 times over 8 years, and never had an issue doing a manual bleed.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don’t know the answer to your question specifically As I’ve never worked on, nor designed an ABS pump. But I’ve flushed and replaced the brake fluid in my Kawasaki ZX-10R ABS 4 times over 8 years, and never had an issue doing a manual bleed.

Rob
Copy that. Thanks, Rob.
 

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I just completed the 18K-mile service on my '16 SDGT. One intake valve was loose enough to warrant a shim change. The rest were in spec. I removed the SAS quite some time ago for easier maintenance. It has zero effect on performance. All modern bikes have some form of SAS. All it does is allow air into the exhaust charge to dilute the % of hydrocarbons. Removing it gets a bunch of plumbing forever out of your way.
The offending left rear intake shim.
 

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Saw their site today and started watching the vid. Are there performance gains to be had? Will it throw a code? Any drawbacks or hampering to the engine without fueling?

10mm shim kit, feelers, spark plugs, filters, wheel nut socket, new chain/sprocket, tires, rear stand, 250lb torque wrench, breaker bars, brake fluid, oil all on order. It was a pricey day, but probably not much more than having the service done at the dealer without the new tires and chain. I'm perfectly capable and I get some new tools to go with. Win.

Is there a gasket kit? Or is the rubber cover gasket reusable?



So will the dirty and the new then all get mixed up? Meaning if I flush a few times will it eventually all be clean? Or does what is in the ABS unit stay there?
You should know brake fluid doesn't get dirty. It cooks brown and cloudy from heat and use and sucking water out of the atmosphere, which is why it should be changed.

I didn't have to replace the cover gaskets as they were still serviceable. The only thing I did replace that I could have re-used are the spark plugs. After seeing the originals, I think they could easily have gone another 18K miles.


Also spent some time putting the underseat wiring in order. I discovered there is a tray underneath with clips to hold the connectors.
 

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As for tips, make sure the center plug tunnel gaskets are in place when you replace the head covers. Same for the o-rings that seal the bottom of the airbox to the throttle bodies. I slid the rear head cover down and back near the rear exhaust drop rather than up and out. And make sure the rubber intake connectors at the front of the box are in their proper place before replacing the air filter and velocity stacks. The throttle bodies need to be pulled off their rubber boots and removed, or at least moved to access the rear cam chain tensioner. In front, you can unbolt the bottom radiator mount bolts and swing the rad forward for better front cylinder access. I removed mine completely for cleaning and draining.
 

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I used lots of zip ties. If something zip-tied was in the way, I cut the tie and replaced it later, I also used zip ties to hold the wiring back out of the way of the rear cylinder access.
 

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Excellent thread team,
I too have wondered about the need to change iridium-tipped plugs, even at 60,000 km (35,000 miles) in my Audi RS3. With a turbo, it generates about 20% more peak power per litre than the SDGT.
Certainly a bigger cylinder bore on the bike, but twin plugs helps that. Handy to have someone seriously technically connected confirm whether there is any real risk of misfire if not replaced at 30,000 km on the KTM, versus 60,000 km on a car??
Cheers,
Gobi One
 

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Follow the maintenance schedule. They know best.

On my 2012 ZX-10R it recommended replacing the Iridium tipped plugs at 16k miles. I did it at 18k miles. They were fine, but I was a little surprised to actually see some dishing of the wider/ground electrode where it was eroding due to the spark.

2x plugs makes no difference to plug wear, they both fire all the time. Keep in mind your bike engine (well my ZX-10R for SURE) revs higher than most cars, and spends it’s life at a higher average RPM. This means more firings of the spark and accelerated wear. A plug that runs at 3k rpm most of it’s life with wear out twice as fast as one that sits at 6k rpm most of its life.

Just my 5c.

Rob
 

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Follow the maintenance schedule. They know best.

On my 2012 ZX-10R it recommended replacing the Iridium tipped plugs at 16k miles. I did it at 18k miles. They were fine, but I was a little surprised to actually see some dishing of the wider/ground electrode where it was eroding due to the spark.

2x plugs makes no difference to plug wear, they both fire all the time. Keep in mind your bike engine (well my ZX-10R for SURE) revs higher than most cars, and spends it’s life at a higher average RPM. This means more firings of the spark and accelerated wear. A plug that runs at 3k rpm most of it’s life with wear out twice as fast as one that sits at 6k rpm most of its life.

Just my 5c.

Rob
Follow the maintenance schedule. They know best.

On my 2012 ZX-10R it recommended replacing the Iridium tipped plugs at 16k miles. I did it at 18k miles. They were fine, but I was a little surprised to actually see some dishing of the wider/ground electrode where it was eroding due to the spark.

2x plugs makes no difference to plug wear, they both fire all the time. Keep in mind your bike engine (well my ZX-10R for SURE) revs higher than most cars, and spends it’s life at a higher average RPM. This means more firings of the spark and accelerated wear. A plug that runs at 3k rpm most of it’s life with wear out twice as fast as one that sits at 6k rpm most of its life.

Just my 5c.

Rob
Follow the maintenance schedule. They know best.

On my 2012 ZX-10R it recommended replacing the Iridium tipped plugs at 16k miles. I did it at 18k miles. They were fine, but I was a little surprised to actually see some dishing of the wider/ground electrode where it was eroding due to the spark.

2x plugs makes no difference to plug wear, they both fire all the time. Keep in mind your bike engine (well my ZX-10R for SURE) revs higher than most cars, and spends it’s life at a higher average RPM. This means more firings of the spark and accelerated wear. A plug that runs at 3k rpm most of it’s life with wear out twice as fast as one that sits at 6k rpm most of its life.

Just my 5c.

Rob
Sound reasoning Trebor27, it may be as simple as that.
 

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I had a quick look through my 30k km (19k miles) service invoice and the cam cover gaskets were changed. Maybe if you have time, you can save them by being very careful when removing them...... but an oil leak might cost a lot of work to go back in and replace them later.

They list 'changed SRS membrane' - but I think that's a typo and should be SAS membrane - my GT still has the SAS and cat, but the charcoal filter has been removed. I don't know for sure if the membrane really needs replacing - and the SAS is often removed and blanked off especially with a decat mid pipe mod.

The plugs are changed at this service (compression ratio on a GT is 13.6 to 1 and Iridium's don't last much longer than 45k kms/30k mls on my CBR1100XX, which has lower compression), as was the coolant (it has a service life of 2yrs being the red OAT type instead of the longer life Green/Blue types used by Honda which have 3yrs life).

My GT needed two exhaust valve shims in the rear cylinder.

What you won't be able to do is check/clear fault codes and exhaust valve (but fit an ESE and this isn't required), and check the CO adjustment (whatever that is), as they all need the KTM diagnostics tool.

My invoice lists the rear hub backlash as being measured and bearings greased - since my cousin did the service at the KTM dealership, I'm confident all this was done as stated and he said to me later, the service manger was on his back to get the bike down off the bench....... but he is a big (ugly) bloke and takes no :poop: from management when working on my bikes..... and he was proud to say he did a lot more than was listed on the invoice..... (y)

Oh yes, cleaning the clutch oil nozzle is listed, and the KTM dealer.net and warranty booklet were both updated.

Items charged were Clutch and Brake fluids ($16Au), Coolant ($75Au), Plugs ($63+$77Au), valve cover gasket set ($69Au), Top Speed 15w50 oil ($74Au).... and the standard $650Au for a very long day's labour.... but I had tyres fitted at the same time so my service was really $1300Au inc gst, and the R5 tyres were another $440 inc gst.......... All good for another 15k kms until I need new tyres again.

I will of course change the oil myself at half way (7,500kms) as it is an easy DIY job.

(y)
 
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Unless you tear something up, gaskets should be good for 2-3 service r&r's. I cleaned the coils and applied some dielectric grease to the o-rings. They pop right out instead of requiring a pliers and rag.
 
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