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Discussion Starter #1
So my 2011 350sxf is coming up close to 100 hours.
I'm the second owner and I'm trying my hardest to really take good care of it and bring everything back to being fresh again.

Going over the whole bike before this riding season starts on everything accept for the motor (well other then valve shims anyway).
Hope to get one more season and then a complete tear down of the motor and refresh it next winter. Until then going to do everything else.

Done the oil and air filter multiple times.
Recently had all the suspension off and fresh fluid in them and the correct springs put in by a local shop (Mission Cycles in Erin, really great please Todd is the best).

What I've been working on the past week:
Changed the rear sprocket, chain guide and put a new gold DID narrow chain (havent taken pictures of that yet).
I put new EBC front and rear brake pads and bled both brakes.
I flushed and back bled the hydraulic clutch also.
I also changed the air intake temperature sensor as it was giving the code for that mainfuctioning sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
There has been a slight sweat of coolants coming from under the water pump so I went ahead and replaced the water pump seal gasket. There is a superceeded part number for this with a better fitting gasket so if your replacing yours make sure to get the newer part number.



Rad hoses were a little rough so I replaced those with some nice orange Factory FX hoses. Mind you I was looking for the "one-piece" Y-pipe design specifically but motorcyclesuperstore sent me the wrong ones.
Being a little impatient to ride already I decided to bight the loss and install these anyway. To do so, you need to re-use the plastic Y connector from the oem set-up and carefully grind off the stamped hose clamps that don't come off very easily. Once that's out you can re-use the plastic Y piece and also the rest of the hose clamps just not the ones that help the Y piece.
The fit of these hoses was very good.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
I went on to replacing my wheel bearings.
The front were actually very good shape and did not need replacing.
The rear had some play so I wanted to replace them.
I did both front and rear wheels since I had the parts already bought and all the tools out. Some things that made the job easy
-small hand torch ($15.00 at Lowe's)
-freezer (putting the bearings in there a couple hours before install)
-high quality grease
-spare old tire to prop the wheel on to make easier to work on

Old crappy All Ballz


Front wheel with bearings out


Rear wheel with bearings out


Bought the good OEM KTM STK bearings made in Italy


New Front bearings



New Rear Bearings
Note: for these I ended up using the shaft seals same part number as from the front wheel. Diameter and bore are the same but the thickness from
the front wheel spacer goes deeper into the wheel and almost perfectly seats agains the bearing seal leaving almost no gap.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
Then I moved on too servicing and greasing the shock linkage bearings.
The one in the dog-bone was in great shape and I thouroughly cleaned and re-greased.

On the linkage 2 out of 3 bearings were in perfect shape so I cleaned and re-greased them.
The 3rd one as you can see in the picture is completely siezed and rotten.
I tried pressing out via the threaded-rod with sockets method but way to rotten. Ended up dremelling the race and it came out.


 

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Discussion Starter #5
After all this I pulled off the crankcase breather and "tee-'ed" if off so less likely to draw in water on the trails


Now finally while preparing to do the valce check and shims (if out of spec and needing replacement) I noticed that both
reinforcing brackets at the top of the engine are cracked.



Already ordered new replacement reinforcing brackets.
Gonna finish things up with the valve clearances this weekend and then pretty much ready to ride.
Probably I'll install some Starcross 5's with HD tubes mid-way through the season.
 

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Fantastic write up on the
refresh.

Do the silicone hoses require a specific clamp?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Fantastic write up on the
refresh.

Do the silicone hoses require a specific clamp?
I re-used the OEM hose clamps except for the "Y" plastic piece.
That's why I originally wanted the new design style where it's all one silicone piece and no plastic splitter in there, but unfortunately they sent me the wrong one.
The oem uses some "stamped" on clamps for that part and they are not removable so you have to cut them off (I used a grinder very carefully).
I just bought 3 extra hose clamps at hardware store for the same diameter and used those. If you can find the hose set that comes as one piece for the "Y" section where they branch off three directions this is much better.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Here's a picture of the new chain and sprocket.
Went with an extreme enduro DID 520VT2 chain this time and the rivet link.
If you notice in the picture, I went with very short wheelbase almost ran out of chain adjuster (going inward into the swingarm). I did this because the 52 rear sproclet will be the largest I would run, so if I put my 50 tooth rear sprocket or even smaller, would have to bring the wheel further out to accomodate the size so I wanted to make sure have lots or room to accomodate this plus any stretch that may happen down the road.
Very solid set-up and hope it holds up with the riding I'm doing which is hard enduro very rocky/rooted/wet terrain.
Went with a 52 tooth KTM Supersprox really nice orange sprocket on the rear. Went up a couple teeth to try running in different gears in some of the single track and steep climbs.
Also installed the brand new OEM KTM chain guide.
With the new wheel bearings, everything greased, new chain/sprockets/chain-guide, and new rear brake pads, this rear wheel glides unbelievably smooth (closest thing I'll ever know to what a brand new rear wheel of a KTM feels like .. lol, minus the small dents in my rim though).



Got around to doing the valve clearance check today.
With the valve cover off things looked nice and clean inside. Looks like previous owner put some silicone on the underside of the rubber valve cover gasket. Will try without it and see if it leaks or not. If leaks I'm going to replace it becuase I belive this one is not supposed to need silicone but I'll look more into it.

The intake valve clearances were perfect, both are exactly 0.13mm and right in the middle of the range (0.10mm-0.15mm allowable).
The exhaust were not 0.13mm, but they weren't 0.12mm either (more like 0.125mm but my feeler gauge doesn't go that small in increments). Manual calls for 0.13mm-0.18mm.

I plan to take it all apart tomorrow I guess, and going to sand down the exhaust shims just slightly enough to bring the gap back to around 0.13mm or 0.14mm.





Curious to know what other's are doing; would you guys leave it alone or be obsessive-compulsive like me and take it all apart for 0.005 of a mm?
I figure if I do it now should be good for the rest of the season (and maybe just a check again mid-way to see where they're at).
 

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Can I have this thread stickied?

I think is a great seed thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks bajadog, cheers!

So here are some more updates.
Also thought I'd put some "notes" as to some specifics to note along the way for some of this work being done.
I haven't posted any more pics yet, hopefully have time tonight to upload them and post in the thread.

Since Sunday, I decided not to take out the cams and wanted to re-measure the gap readings.
My space heater is just about on it's last legs and it was pretty cold in my garage and I didn't like the readings.
I decided I will recheck the clearances. I bought a new space heater and ran it a couple hours before checking the
valve clearances (it's still quite cold up here in the "great-north" around 0 to -2 daytime and -7 to -10 overnight).
Re-measured the gaps and both intake valves were 0.13mm bang on. Exhaust valve on the left (clutch side) was 0.15mm,
and exhaust valve on the right (brake side) was 0.14mm. These readings are perfect as per the manual, also makes sense
with how the bike starts and runs both hot and cold (which is flawlessly, so far). Not going to replace any shims this
time and will re-check near mid-season around June or July after another 20-30 hours or so.

Note: Manual calls for 20c (68f) approx temperature to measure valve clearances. If you live in a colder climate
and have your bike in the garage make sure to run a space heater and get things up to around or close to room
temperature to measure the gaps for a more accurate reading.

Note: Measuring your valve clearances, insert the feeler gauge from the back side of the bike to slide in and measure gap.

Note: Measuring valve clearances you need to find TDC. To do this easily put the bike in top gear and gently turn the
rear tire by hand until the "flat side" behind the cam lobe (part of the cam on the left/clutch side of the bike) lines up
with the 2 dots on the cam bracket and both dots are clearly visible. To confirm this, you can pull the crank locking bolt
which is found on the right/brake side of the bike at the bottom just forward of the engine case by the rear brake pedal.







Note: If pulling the crank lock bolt and you have oil in the motor (haven't drained for an oil change), you can tip the bike
over on it's side (not fully on the ground but tilted quite far over) and you can remove the bolt without losing oil. Easy
way I did this was put a zip-tie on the front brake lever so the bike won't move easily and tipped the bike against my garage
wall. When you look inside if you see a black hole and not the side of the crank then you know you are TDC. You can take off
the copper washer (the really thick one) and gently insert the locking bolt all the way to lock the crank in this position so
you can work away measuring you clearances without the engine possibly moving.
IMPORTANT, put some tape or something to mark the lock bolt area so you don't forget to re-install the copper washer when you
are done. Don't try starting the bike with the lock bolt fully sank into the crank as this would not be good.





Note: If you do replace shims and pull the cams make sure to mark the timing chain in respect to the cam gear (once you've locked
the crank already). I use a wax pencil works great and mark 2 points on the chain to the cam gear on both cams (some say can also
use liquid paper). This way when the chain tensioner is taken out and you pull the chain off you know exactly where to put it back on lining up all 4 dots.
Also loop a wire or coat hanger through the chain when you take it off and brace it up so not chance it would fall into the bottom end of the motor when your working in there replacing shims.

Note: Water Pump Cover gasket part number for the 2011 350 manual is 77235053000 and has been superseded and the NEW PART
NUMBER is 77735052000. The new part number seals better and won't leak like most of the 2011/12 350's.

Note: Spark plug, OEM for 2011 350sxf is 77239093000 NGK-LMAR9AI-8. Gap should be 0.8mm (0.031 in).
If you are replacing it a good time to do this is when you have the valve cover off as this bike has some clearance issues to get into
the hole for the plug because the frame is so close above it. With the valve cover off you can also pull out the upper aluminum
part of the spark plug hole tube, it's not threaded just twist it a little and pull up. This way you have much better access at the plug.
Still the plug is a very small diameter and I found that none of my plug sockets in my tool box work and YOU WILL NEED THE KTM TOOL KIT with the special spark plug tool. I have to borrow my friends. Always install the plug gently and torque only to spec. Also, make sure to warm up the bike thoroughly before attempting to remove the plug so it comes out easier.

Note: Oil filter - paper filter is the best and the OEM KTM filter work perfectly. I try and stay away from the metal mesh cleanable
filters (mine actually came with one from previous owner). The metal filter, they just can't manufacture the metal weave small enough to filter as well as paper, so sticking with the paper filter means better filtration (yes you have to replace them though, and can't just clean like the metal ones).

Some other specs to list as quick reference (specifically for the 2011 KTM 350SXF):
Engine Oil and Capacity: SAE 10W50 1.10L / 1.16QT
Engine Oil Filter: OEM paper 77338005100
Coolant Capacity: 0.95L / 1QT
Brake Fluid: DOT 4
Fuel Capacity and Type: 7.5L 91 octane
Front Brake Pads: 77013020000 BRAKE PADS TOYO B153
Rear Brake Pads: 54813090300 BRAKE PAD SET REAR TOYO

Should post some more pics tonight or tomorrow.
Any further maintenance will list the updates here and any details on the work being done.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Also got a chance to help my friend with his 2015 500EXC.
SO much easier with the single cam and rockers design (like my old honda's were).





Just remove plug and valve cover and gasket.
Rotate rear tire for find TDC. This one has a bigger distinct punch mark on the cam holder and the cam gear. Line those up to get it TDC.

Measure clearances.
If having to replace shims it's much easier on this design.



Unbolt the rocker pin bolts. Remove the side cover "port" wholes to access the rocker shafts from the brake side of the head (make sure not to lose little rubber seals). Be mind full that the shaft have the ever so slightest "flat" across the top and that's the same way you should reinstall after you're done with the flatter side on top. To take out the rocker shafts use one of the M6 bolts and thread in the side of the rocker shaft from the side access port whole just enough so you can grab hold of it and slide it out.

Use a magnet to get the shims out of the buckets.
Re measure shim sizes and deduce the difference needed.
Replace with new sizes of shims using a magnet to locate the shim in the bucket and then gently use your fingers/finger nails to rock it into place.

Reinstall rocker shafts (flat side up) using the M6 bolt same way you took it out. Reinstall shaft pin bolts and the valve cover gasket and cover. Don't forget to reinstall the shaft access port hole covers/bolt on the side of the head with the little rubber O-rings.
 

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Wow.

I thought all the new 4 stroke KTMs were DOHC.

Thanks for pointing that out.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
All back together and ready to rock!
Just waiting on some fresh rubber but will install that later when they come in.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, though I'd post up some more since the last "big" maintenance.
Since then have done oil/oil-filter every 10 hours and air filter every ride.

Only changes since then were a neat little riser kit I installed (it was $34.00 and is universal so I can use on other bike. It's designed like shims so youcan change sizes to try different heights. Neat little in-expensive product:
BikeMaster Handlebar Risers Black 1 1/8"
https://fortnine.ca/en/bikemaster-handlebar-risers).

Also installed Enduro Engineering Bark Busters with hand guards.
These go without saying top notch stuff.

Oh yeah and I installed heavy duty tire tubes and Micheline Starcross 5 Tires (100/19) in soft compound. Amazing tires!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It was time or valve shims check again and probably replace this time due to some symptoms that have arose. Figured it would be exhaust shims and I was right. Bike has some difficulty on cold starts and also some backfiring when hot and well into the days ride.

So I tackled the job again.
Some important things to point out with the valve shim check is the bike must be TDC, and I searched this quite allot on the web and have seen some confirmation that for this KTM is doesn't matter whether comp or exhaust stroke for the TDC, just line up the dots to the flats behind the cam lobes (on the opposite side from the cam chain/gears). When you have those lined up you can use the locking bolt without the washer on it to lock the engine in place (see my earlier post in this thread for detail). If you are using the locking bolt it's recommended to disconnect battery to avoid any possibility of the starter button hit by accident. I also pull the throttle cables out of the way to help access the area better.



Once you are at TDC and you have measured the clearances (manual asks for 0.13mm-0.18mm on the exhaust and I had 0.13mm and 0.12mm and decided to change both) then mark the cam chain so that you know where to put it back and not mess up the timing. I use a wax pencil and mark both cam gears to the chain in 2 spots each, and also I zip-tie one of the cams (only remove and work on one side at a time). This was no possibility to mess up the timing.



Before removing the cam bridge, I found that the upper little rad hose in the frame was in my way (could be the aftermarket ones I have might be thicker) so I used a couple zip-ties to pull it towards the frame and little out of my way (just made life easier).







When removing the cam chain tensioner, note that there is barely any clearance from the frame and adjacent rad hoses. Use a 28mm hand wrench (I could not fit a socket). When you loosen the larger bolt (the little one is for adjustment you don't need to loosen that right now, that comes later), try and take off the large 28mm bolt/holder first and not bring the piston with it (both won't come out together doesn't fit or have room). When the bolt is off you can pull the piston out separately and make sure not to lose/leave behind the rubber O-ring for the piston.





Cam comes out, pull up the little black plastic shim covers (don't know the name they just sit on top of the shim and are what the cam lobes press.
Then swap your shims to the correct ones based on your clearance check and desired clearance. Reinstall the cam, line up your marks when putting on the chain, and then move on to installing the tensioner.

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Note, for the tensioner you have to set it to it's shortest (and locked) position to be able to install it otherwise it's open too far and will over-tighten and press really hard against the chain. It's simple to set, with the skinnier size down on a flat surface (table), I used 2 quarters (Canadian money not sure if US is same size) and press down HARD until it squirts out the remaining oil in it and locks down to that position with only 3mm or so of the piston showing. You can install like this. Then when you put back the piston with O-ring and then the 28mm bolt to hold it, you take off the smaller bolt to access the piston to give the "initial installed tension". Using a fairly skinny phillips or robby screwdriver press the part of the piston you can access from that bolt whole until you feel/hear it pop out to the default tension to hold your chain.



Now you can remove the locking bolt from the engine, and in top gear (sorry forgot to mention earlier but this is the same way you find TDC) you rotate the rear wheel to turn the crank a few times. Then find TDC again and lock the engine again. Now with your new shims you're re-checking the clearance to make sure the work you did is correct (I just like to make sure the crank was rotated a bunch of times before checking the reading again of the clearances).

Re-assemble the rest (valve cover gasket and valve cover) and get ready to rip and test out how the bike runs. I rode twice this weekend after the valve adjustment the bike starts instantly always, and not one backfire in about 12 hours of riding. Anyone have any questions on this stuff, I'm no expert but I'm happy to share any experience from doing it myself and other stuff I've read online.

One thing I did notice lately is I burn around 400 +/- ML of oil around every 8 hours of riding. Also on the magnetic oil drain plug had some small metal particles and one circular aluminum shaving (see pic). I have a feeling (and hope it's only this) that the oil ring on the piston is deteriorating. I plan to do the piston and rings this winter anyway and just hope it's not something else and lets go before then (still have lots of fall riding to do lol).



I've been riding with a broken foot for the last 5 weeks and just getting little better now and really enjoying the weather cooling off slightly too (was an absolute scorcher of a summer up here). Cheers and happy riding!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So, prior to posting the big long details on the top end rebuild I just started, thought I'd just throw up a note about gearing.
Was running the stock 14 front and a bigger 52 rear, and never quite had the right pull in the tight single track for 2nd and 3rd. Switched to a 13t front and 51 rear and it is perfect!! This is the offroad gearing if you have a 350 SX.
Also safety wired my sprocket, from years racing and seeing parts fall off occasionally I just had to get the piece of mind.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/OFImffDwfYOAk4o9IQus7nD5HJKSN6SyBbBDLPiAOUZqhmRMrGkcX3FLogQB4VCz8pgGYPutFRrSIArejFdjS27h1-AGrL4H9pJSrap8vaPt3r-xYJU-JZtTjRWAyNdSJfJpCYDQOo6qdT05fN4r9GfwVhmnkimedTqQJ20V8qHWmq_96cuKMLQiL9UcDE3Vr3_1eh7RD7Z2WOGqo6af1Hkz7BHB-vVDXsG8FUr7DpvN8Qnxc4Bjjh0T2VKNx0e_bliFcuITQIpSYNYJCSonlD9_PrvZBmmlAYD_TimHvrzThwF4NbW7wib9g-D5TJfkrKDwXvpa1-uNXTuM6WT8jiCFNWBulLTR39w58tBEm8E2Cig4QtEhrdHSLFPCd9jAfEOHdoTZjxa-3PQh9_WZrNiCQmqi7uixulIV7i3swc5Hg1Qnl9tFRfdlR9Gflr7--YAzsGYLRLimJ0xZQqvw-5-LbHF9FUZSrAsFKQzK4XnGfJ3rY5GVY7GoVklRVe5yQjIRRLouFzM-BRTpOJEYH2iiBOSOAMRGe1-W58TDUZ22qV1qHm33Hq-3yC7Ok5zBeuGA8xZp4O1pUWDwaZYWBkrsBmUTaE3RsUV4aBkqYohKVjy8532O1uQQCiPsDahQtzKgSBI-rSoB6mUURcX5spghiIgOqNO7sr_7X_Np=w479-h638-no



Will be posting the top-end rebuild first half soon (the tear down).
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
************************************************
******* TOP END PISTON CHANGE INFO HERE ********
************************************************

So here goes the tear down info.
Also can't seem to get my photobucket photos to work and using google which
seems to share the link only and not the image itself.

First off, clean the bike very well. All the wiring harness and those components above the head can drop all kinds of dirt into the head and eventually bottom end when you have it all apart.

Start the process off same way as if checking valve clearances.
Pull spark plug wire.
Pull valve cover bolts.
Remove engine brace brackets.
Remove valve cover and gasket.
I zip tied my throttle cables to the frame and out of the way.
I removed the upper rad hose so that it gives clearance to remove the head.

Next, we have to find TDC.
I use the rear wheel and put the bike in top gear 5th on the SX.
Rotate until the dots on the cams opposite end (not the gear side) line up with the flats of the cam gear.

https://goo.gl/photos/kGNi4jhwWy43coiy8

https://goo.gl/photos/w1DChzUVbKpQgRJRA

Once these are lined up there is a bolt on the bottom of the bike to lock the crank at TDC (and this also confirms you are in fact at TDC).
Drain the motor oil from the bike and then pull the crank-locking bolt, remove the thick copper washer and reinstall so it goes fully in and locks TDC.

https://goo.gl/photos/zXMQWfp116UiUeuY8

Next, I take an extra step to mark my timing and I don't believe it is necessary but for me it's an extra piece of mind. Using my wax pencil I mark a point on the cam and also that link in the chain where it sits on the cam gear. And I do this on both cams. This way once the chain is off and I go to put it all back together later I can use this to confirm my timing is same as it was.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Before removing the cams or head, the air intake needs to come off.
In an online how-to video I saw a guy unbolt the rear subframe and lift it just enough to pull off the intake boot. The exhaust will need to be removed to do this. (good video).

Next, will have to remove the cam chain tensioner to be able to remove cams and the entire head. When pulling the tensioner pull the big bolt (24mm) and remove that first before pulling the actual tensioner and rubber o-ring (hard to get it to clear frame and rad hoses otherwise).

After tensioner is out the cams can be pulled.
Remove the aluminum shaft for the spark plug port.
Remove the cam bridge (working the bolts from out-to-in as per manual).
Remove the cam chain off the cams and I made a zip tie loop and hooked it on the frame so doesn't fall into the bottom end.
Remove cams to be able to access the bolts to un-bolt the head.

https://goo.gl/photos/QFDnhWCoLbfwA5Z49

The bolts to remove the head are 50Nm so they will be a little tough to get off. 2 on the outside of the head and 2 inside the head just under where the cams sat. Also there is one bolt that holds the head to the cylinder specifically (the long ones actually pass though both head and cylinder to hold on the block), and this little nut needs to be taken off on the cam gear side outside of the head.
You have to give a tug and free up the head gasket and carefully lift and slide the head off the cylinder. Note to pull it out of the frame, due to clearance issues on the SX model you have to lift as high as you can, and then rotate it to get the wide side out of the frame and can tip and pull it out.

https://goo.gl/photos/85J1LS3JXtYmnzZT6
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Next, the cylinder needs to come off.
It is actually free at this point just firmly in place from the piston and base gasket holding it. You have to firmly but gently pull it up off the piston and remove from the bike.

https://goo.gl/photos/a5Gh2ikh1bzkGr497

I kept the gaskets in as best condition as I could. Even though getting new ones just keep for piece of mind in case absolutely in a bind and need to reuse them (which is not recommended).
Also when it comes to the old gasket material left on the cylinder (mine had the top half of the base gasket caked onto the bottom of the cylinder) be very careful when removing the old material so you don't comprimise the sealing surface. I used carb cleaner and a PLASTIC putty knife (painting tool) very lightly losening up the gasket material with the carb cleaner and most of it came off with my finger nails leaving the surface underneath perfect.





I was checking the head for marks and wear by running my fingernail on the front and back (exhaust and intake sides) where the piston skirt runs. It doesn't feel too bad, you can visibly see some wear on those parts but could be normal. I am taking the cylinder to a professional engine builder to get looked at for wear and measure for roundness and bore. This will tell me if needs to be milled to a new size piston, or if needs re-plating, of if it's fine and just get the sizing to know what piston to get (A or B). KTM SX model uses a very good Vertex high compression piston.

https://goo.gl/photos/n7mred1inpp47dZW8

The head will also be dropped off at the engine builder. I am not an engine specialist of even close to knowing what wear to look for and changing valves, guides, seals, re-cut, change springs etc. So will leave that to the pro's and get cylinder and head cleaned up all at once.

https://goo.gl/photos/4AcRQCmzFaDKoPAy7
 
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