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Discussion Starter #1
Sticky situation!

The throttle has 3 parts that can stick:

Throttle grip. Dismantle and clean. (should anyhow be done after a dirty day of riding!)
- Check rubber grip for rips where dirt can get in and cause a jam, replace if damaged.
- Check handlebar for damage from dirt/sand, file/sand off and make sure it is smooth.
- Check throttle tube for damage, replace if not able to polish off.
- Dismantle clean and check "housing". Check that screw in middle of pulley is fitted properly. If yours has a small bearing in middle of pulley, clean and check.
- Look for any damage/wear. If you can see some that looks excessive replace whole throttle handle.

Throttle cable. Take off from handle and carbi.
- Check that cable runs freely when you pull from one end. If even small hesitation replace cable!
- Look for kink or damage on cable. Replace cable if found.
- Look for freying (sp??) of wire. If even one strand is broken replace cable!

Carbi. Take off the bike so you can inspect properly.
- Unscrew lid on top. Take out throttle slide, remove throttle cable.
- There is a plastic piece that sits on the cable under the spring and that goes inside the throttle slide from the top and keeps the needle in position. That one only fits in one position: It has a small lug that sticks out that goes in the slot of the throttle.
- Check spring for kink/damage. Also that it was fitted properly. If damaged replace.
- Check throttle slide for damage. If small you can polish off, if big replace.
- Check inside carbi where throttle slide slides up and down. Any dirt in there? Any damage?
- Check needle. Needs to be straight and clip fitted properly. If bent replace.
- Take out main jet. Check. (I have never had one with damage that causes needle to jam, but you never know...)

If you do these checks you should be able to find the issue!

Good Luck!!
 

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Dirt Wizard
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And a cramp in wrist
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Cracking the KTM CDI code!

In 2018 I also worked on cracking the CDI coding and think I got quite close!

Here a 2015 KTM 125sx CDI number: 503 39 231 000
I will replace the numbers with letters: ABC DE FGH IJK

Where, I think (but can be wrong) that the letters represent as follows:

AB = bike model. 65cc=46, 85cc=47, 125/144/150/200cc=50, 250cc=54 etc
THE ABC = 503 FROM 1998 - 2015 WAS FOR THE 125/144/150/200 ENGINES FROM 1998-2015

C = version of bike (looks like these are not based on a year but the number goes up when a new version is released). 125/150sx: 2000-2015=3, 2016-2018=4, and a resently released upgrade of the CDI for 2019 models have '5' in the C spot.

DE = Manufacturers code. All KTM CDI's have 39 here. (039 in a standard barcode represents USA... but I would not assume they have worried abot aligning themself here in some way). This could also be the number that means KTM at the manufacturer. (Could also just mean "CDI")

F = Country of use for the CDI. 0 = General, 1 = Europe, 2 = US

GH = Not sure, but all CDI's have 31 here. Again, could be manufacturer or country the CDI comes from? Or perhaps just mean CDI.

IJK = This would be upgrade number and some other inside number like who did the upgrade etc.

NOTE: Where a CDI is suitable for more than one model of bike the three first numbers will be different to indicate this. I have not been worried about trying figure this out.

I might be totally wrong and you might have some factual info (as I have only based my conclusions on what I have been able to figure out). If so, please share!!

WHEN WRITING THIS THERE IS NO SXS VERSION OF THE CDI AVAILABLE FROM KTM FOR 2016 BIKES ONWARDS

SUPPLIERS CAN ONLY CHANGE THE MAPPING IN SOME OF THE XC MODELS, BUT EVEN THAT WILL STOP SHORTLY

EDIT: NOTE, the CDI in the picture below is a 2019 version one and not, as the text in the picture would have you believe (a 2016 version). The "5" in the "C" spot is the giveaway. Sorry re any confusion.
 

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Dirt Wizard
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I feel like i've been teleported to a parallel universe.
Axzon mustn't have discovered beer yet. Brain's thinking to much. Give your brain the night off @Axzon , go have a couple coldies.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I feel like i've been teleported to a parallel universe.
Yep... was asked by @cors187 if I could put my more detailed postings in this thread that he started for me... so as I locate them I will do so. For those here that reads all that is posted it will be a deja vu moment. But for ones who are looking for help and does not have unlimited time to trawl through the complete forum this might help. Who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Axzon mustn't have discovered beer yet. Brain's thinking to much. Give your brain the night off @Axzon , go have a couple coldies.
Now 12:43 AM here and I have a few cans inside me. My lady friend tells me I think too much when I drink...>:)
 

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Dirt Wizard
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Yep... was asked by @cors187 if I could put my more detailed postings in this thread that he started for me... so as I locate them I will do so. For those here that reads all that is posted it will be a deja vu moment. But for ones who are looking for help and does not have unlimited time to trawl through the complete forum this might help. Who knows.
Ahh right. Best I remove my smart a-se banter from above then?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Why does my brake fluid keep on expanding?

Brake fluid boils when it gets too hot. The heat comes from the brake pads when they are engaged against the brake disc. There are a few reasons the brake fluid starts boiling (this will make the brake fluid expand and normally makes your brake to grab).

Reasons for Brake Fluid to boil:
(Dry boiling point = Fresh new brake fluid with no contamination.
Wet boiling point = Brake fluid contaminated with water [indicates 3.7% or more water in the brake fluid]. )
- You are using DOT 3 when the recommended brake fluid is DOT 4.
DOT 3 boiling points: Dry 205°C, Wet 140°C
DOT 4 boiling points: Dry 230°C, Wet 155°C
DOT 5.1 boiling points: Dry 260°C, Wet 180°C
(Do not use DOT 5 as it is a silicone based fluid and does not mix with the others)
- Your brake fluid is contaminated and therefore boils in normal use, replace the fluid!
- Your brake pads are worn too thin and transfer more heat in to the brake caliper making the brake fluid boil.
- Your brake is adjusted incorrectly and the pads drag on the brake disc creating heat that will at some point get high enough to boil the brake fluid.
- Some brake calipers also come new with a plate/disk between the brake pad and the piston in the caliper. This will also help with keeping the temperature transfer down.

We use DOT 5.1 in all our brakes. The price difference to DOT 4 is small and it gives us 30°C more tolerance.

Also worth a mention: As soon as you open that bottle of brake fluid it will start to get contaminated by water from the air! Always replace the cap on the bottle as soon as you have used it. Same thing obviously applies to the brake fluid you have in your bike's brake systems! We tend to wash our bikes with a hig pressure water jet. It makes the cleaning soo much easier, but will also add to the contamination of the brake fluid! If you use a water jet you need to replace the brake fluid more often! I tend to replace our front and back brake fluids at 3 months of use.
 
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