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Broke the outter clutch hub trying to torque the crank nut to the correct spec. Doesn’t quite add up right? Another genius move. That’s another 330 down the drain. Gotta wait til my next paycheck too.

Tried to replace the water pump bearing cuz it felt gritty and now the new one is almost all the way in. Just another mm to go but it won’t budge. Guess I didn’t heat the recess enough. Can’t pull it out without ruining the bearing and I can’t heat the case without melting the crank seal right next to it.

After this clutch hub it’ll be nearly 1500 on this reabuild and almost a year of not being able to ride. I’m so fed up with this. Every time I work on it something else goes wrong and I’m out even more money and the time it takes to ship the parts here.
I feel your pain! At times it is one step back to get two forward. And the worst part is if you cause that your self. But it is easy to be clever afterwards... I once bought an Audi 100 (the old original ones that won Rally Champs as a Quattro). I spent hours reading up re repairs (had a 3 gear auto that did not shift in to 3'rd, but still easily did the speed limits...) and took out the gearbox to replace it with a recond one. After many hours I had the job done. That auto only lasted 10 hours before the reverse died... so out it came again. With both now in pieces I made one out of the good bits. And it worked!!

My point is: I was now an expert having info on a redundant gearbox for a car that there is probably less than 100 in my country (New Zealand) and I have seen none other on the road! It would have costed me US$ 500 to have the original one sorted by an auto gearbox specialist (I found out later...). So that redundant info is now filling up my head together with electronic engineering from the 70's, PCB drilling machines servicing (that used punch tape "data storage")... hmmm where was I going with this... not sure. :grin2:

I have a complete clutch hub from a 2012 125sx that is the same as yours that you could have for US$150 including postage. We dismantled the bike and sold most of the bits. The clutch hub was to be a spare, but now when I have fitted a Hinson to our 2016 bike it is surplus. Has had approx 30 hours of use and has minor marks from the plates but noting that will cause issues.

Let me know if you are interested. (I don't have the hub for sale anywhere as I was happy having it on my shelf for a rainy day).
 

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Discussion Starter #102
Axzon you are 100% right. As annoying as This is, it’s all a lesson to be learned and valuable knowledge that’ll come in handy down the road. The two lessons I learned today are #1 give yourself time to cool off before posting on a forum, otherwise you (me) risk looking like a whiny little b*tch. and #2 proper tools have their place. I really appreciate your offer and I definitely want that hub. I’ll direct message you about it.
 

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Patience and persistance

Good advice @Axzon best to stop and study before the job goes all to hell:crying2:
Most of us learn as much from our failures as we learn from our success. Feel free to look up my stupidity challenge for a few of my personal examples:surprise: the folks that don’t make mistakes ain’t trying hard enough. Good on you @Freggles for your persistance. Your mechanical repair abilities are a work in progress and making good progress. Your persistance and honest hard work and ethics have earned the respect and admiration of myself and others here. Be sure to check back for help as needed and update your progress. Best regards
 

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Discussion Starter #104
Always comin in clutch with the pep talk augiedoggie. Just got Axzion’s outter hub fitted with the inner clutch hub as well. Now I’ve gotta clean up shop to find the new lock washer and nut...

One more issue I’ve got is the water pump bearing. When I had the bearings replaced I supplied the parts and was missing those little buggers (power valve bearing too). They’re about the size of a quarter (same part number). The power valve bearing went in easy. I heated up an iron rod which fit almost snug in the blind bearing hole and the bearing fell right in. The other bearing however will not seat all the way, even with a good bit of persuasion from the perfect size impact socket and a rubber mallet. I have taken it out and tried again and again with no luck, but it looks like it stops at the same depth every time. It sticks out about 1.5mm maybe a bit more. Here’s a pic. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #105
I was about to do the squish test but I’m now seeing that one of the threaded holes on the cylinder where the head clamps down was stripped and replaced with a larger thread. Looks like a timesert or something of that type. I don’t have a single bolt that fits it... all the others are fine
 

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Regarding the bearing: take it out and make sure the hole it fits in does not have any ridges. I normally put the bearings in the freezer and heat up the hole with a heat gun (looks a little like a hair dryer).

Hard to say what thread you have there. KTM's have metric threads, but US tends to love non-metric ones. Sadly I am useless on them so can not help you sorry. Did the bike not come with all the bolts and nuts needed? What I would do is take the cylinder to an engineering firm and ask them to identify the thread. Should cost you very little/nothing. They should also be able to fit a sleeve with the original thread in there for you so that you do not have to worry keeping one odd bolt.
 

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Regarding lock washer and nut for the clutch: Use some blue locktite on the thread, and do not tighten it with all your might! I always tighten the nut so that the lock washers bendy bits make a flat connection with the outside of the nut. I never had a problem with this. (You can often tighten the nut a fraction more, but then the lock washer does not mate properly with the nut. But if you can tighten the nut so that the sharp edge of the nut is in middle of the lock washers bendy bit then I recommend doing so, as not tightening it that far will leave the hub alittle loose.

And ALWAYS use a new lock washer!! It is a cheap guarantee!
 

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Thread mess

Going well @Freggles bummer about the thread, but it’s just a bump not a roadblock.
I would hesitate to make the bastard thread an operation here. If you can find a properly fitted bolt, just move forward. Your standard fastener size was probably 8mm and I suspect your gypsy bolt may have been changed to American standard size. Have a look at a 3/8 bolt and see if she threads in that bastard sized hole. Perhaps someone modified it previously. Don’t use excessive force to test for a thread fit
Be sure your bolt fits through the cylinder head before final assembly. I use a paint marker to identify the bolt and the bore location for future repair identification.
 

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Back to your bearing, how deep is that hole when you compare it against your bearing thickness?
 

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Don't wanna blow me own trumpet here, but I am good with threads.
That's what I specialise in when I put down the tools.
Can you give me a pic of the thread or bolt that come out?

Can you support the case behind the bearing and get a bit more mongrel with it? Does it sound home? You will never get the "home" sound with a rubber mallet. If you have a socket against the outer race, don't be afraid to use a steel bang stick, just don't go over board.
 

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Discussion Starter #111
Soooo I went and picked up some spare bolts to check what the thread was and it turns out it actually matches the rest of the bolts... 🏽 The human error is strong over here.

Looks like I lost all of the M7x1 bolts that originally held the head on so I’ll go get some tomorrow and proceed with the squish tests.

As far as the bearing goes, the depth of the recess is the same as the size of the walls of the bearing. I tried to press it in again using a small butane torch to get the case temp up but it only pressed in a little further than before. More time with the torch?

I’m definitely not getting the home feel on this bearing like I did with the power valve bearing. Maybe the steel hammer is the way to go.

I did see some very vague lines (ridges?) on the recess walls when the bearing was out, however I rubbed them and couldn’t feel anything. Hopefully they’re negligible?

One more little issue is that the kickstarter shaft is still stuck on the clutch case because there’s a steel bushing that looks like it’s never been taken off before and is rusted to the shaft. I’ve tried WD40, a butane torch, prying with a screwdriver, and a BFH but it’s not budging. I’ve heard sprocket pullers work to get the kicker off but I can hardly get a screwdriver behind the bushing. I guess the starter assembly doesn’t need to come off for reassembly but the excessive heat I used probably ruined the shaft seal... hmmm
 

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Put the whole thing in the freezer for the night, get the gas ready and all in place. Take the cover out from freezer, heat bushing quickly and use the BFH while the casing is securely on two wooden blocks. (use a piece of alloy bar 1"x1" or similar and keep it on the shaft while you hit it with the BFH.
 

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Discussion Starter #113
Tried the freezer and torch method with the BFH and still nothing. But I did notice the tone change when it seated. I took the bearing out yet again and checked the part number with the oem bearing and it matches. Measured the sidewalk with some putty I pressed in and I guess my measurements were off the first time using a length of wire. It must’ve bent in there or something. The bearing wall is about half a mm larger than the recess. Put it back in and got the water pump, clutch and all put back. Tested it by turning the crank and it doesn’t seem to cause issue with the race sticking out. Still doesn’t leave me too confident but I’ll check for coolant flow when I start her up.

Good news though. THE MOTOR IS FINISHED!!! I might be able to ride before the end of the summer if I can get these powder coated parts back from the customs guy. He’s had them for a few months now and every time he gives me a date to pickup he pushed it back when I’m on the way. Really annoying but he’s sent me pics of some of the finished parts (attached) and they look good. Plus the price is decent. $340 for the frame, swingarm, bark busters, brake pedal, bar clamps, foot pegs, and steering triple upper and lower. I forgot to give him the shift leaver but at this point I’m not waiting for the return. He stripped and cleaned them, had someone blast the parts, put a chrome paint down, then a translucent turquoise over it. Looks amazing. I just hope he masked off everywhere I told him to and had the blast guy use a light media. We’ll see.

I’ve got new swingarm bearings to put in along with new lower shock bearing/spacers. Not sure if I got the parts to do the upper shock.

Once I get everything back together I just need to take the bike to my mechanic to have him bleed the brakes and clutch. I’m not a fan of doing that work myself. Tried it in the past on my street bikes and I always end up with microscopic bubbles for days. The guy uses a pump that circulates the fluid through. It’s a lil pricey but full proof. If anyone has a cheaper method to make the job easier for me please let me know.

Fingers crossed it won’t blow as soon as I start it. I plan on running it through quite a few heat cycles. I.e. run it on a stand in neutral with varying rpm until the rads are hot to the touch, shut it and let it cool all the way down and repeat. I’m really worried this Wiseco forged piston is too tight in there. KTM manual says keep a gap no larger than .006 and it’s right at that. But the stock piston is cast so idk. There’s no thermostat in the coolant system so the cylinder will take longer to get up to temp right? Is that something to be worried about? The closer it gets the more I worry.

The tranny seems to operate semi-smoothly. I tested it without the clutch plates in just spinning the sprocket and changing gears. Sometimes it stuck in 4th or 3rd on my way up the gears and I just clicked it all the way back to 1st and back up to 5th. I think it’s because my hand can’t put a constant load on the sprocket and the gears just didn’t mesh correctly.

Sorry for the disorganized novel. After a year long rebuild with every step in between going wrong I have a hard time envisioning a success in the end. At least I’ve got the knowledge of how every system in the bike works now though. Thank you all for your help and dealing with my inaccurate measurements and misinformation. This community has been the biggest help in this rebuild along with rockymountainatvs oem parts section. Shoulda told y’all to invest in them before I started this. I’m sure I drove up the stock a few points lmaoooo
 

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Discussion Starter #114
Also what tranny fluid do you think I should use? I’ve heard use oem or some people have good luck using ATF instead. Any thoughts?
 

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KTM expert

Welcome back and good to hear your progress. Always happy to hear from you. I’m not certain the bearing protruding as you are describing is problematic or not as yet. I’m not sure I understand the concern here. Maybe a picture of the problem can help me. Or if she’s right and turning free, we’re all smiles here.:grin2:
I use the generic Wiseco piston clearance chart supplied with piston. No worries, piston manufacturers take good care with tolerances we just double check before assembly. Just use cheap ATF the first few trans fluid changes and use the fancy stuff after she proves herself. The trans fluid will flush any residual crud and clutch debris present after break in. Looks like a fine and pretty bike you have there my friend. Keep in touch, post lots of pictures and check back for help or advice as needed. Best Regards
 

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Discussion Starter #116
It’s been an incredible help having you and all the other members offering up all of this advise. I learned a lot because of the chat here and I know it’ll help me in the future.

As soon as she’s back together I’ll post up pics and a video of her running er maybe not running who knows lol.

As far as the bearing goes, I’ve never seen in that site that far from flush so it concerned me but the water pump lined up cleanly with the clutch cover and turns smooth so we’re all good.
 

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Discussion Starter #117
The bikes coming together nicely, I do have some wiring questions though. I know I need to being the powder coat off of the areas where grounds connect but I should’ve taken more pictures when I originally pulled the wiring off. This is a 125sx but it’s got a full wiring harness that includes some bits I haven’t seen. I included pictures of the parts I’m unsure of and I drew out a wiring diagram for the ignition system not including the extra bits for headlight, tail light, blinkers, brake switches, etc. the cylindrical piece that leads to the spark plug, should both of the metal bits be grounded? I circled the spot that it looks like it would fit up to but I don’t want to ground anything if it should be somewhere else. As for the black box... what is it? It leads to the stator, the previous part, and the kill switch.

For the wiring of the speedo, headlight, and the other bits on the front of the bike, will grounding to the upper triple clamp work? I know it should ground to the rest of the frame but there’s grease and bearings in between the triple and the frame. I’d expect that not to be a great conductor
 

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Black box syndrome??

She’s going well @Freggles not to worry much about a few bumps along the way. She runs before and she be running again for you. Good to clean your metal surface with abrasive to a shiny metal and use dielectric grease on the virgin metal to prevent corrosion and possible future trouble there. I suspect your bike may use a XC wiring harness. The 125 and 200 share a lot of parts. Stuff can be switched and changed over the years on a machine that age. Your black box is your ignition module. See if she has a part number on it and research the year and model it was used on and start by finding wiring diagram for this model. If you are unable to find wiring diagram on internet perhaps one of our forum friends can help here. Otherwise you should be able to get ignition connected to get it running. Wiring connectors from stator to module are usually directional connectors unless they had been previously cut or modified. The other stator/alternator wires are probably lighting or charging coil. Hopefully you can find a wiring diagram and not have to resort to plug and hope wiring method. You can plug stator to module and module to coil and test for spark when cranking.
 

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Discussion Starter #119
I’ve got spark!
I did the swingarm bearing for the rear shock which I had to tap and pull just like the swingarm bolt a while back. And my swingarm pivot bearings are almost done but I only ordered 2 stop rings instead of four so as soon as those come in I can get the rear end back together and get her running
 

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Doing well!

Nice to see you getting there!

The CDI (black box) is specific to each model. It regulates when the spark happens and has a curve programmed in to it. If you fit a CDI from another model (or same model but after an KTM upgrade) the spark will be at the wrong time and can cause damage. Sadly the info on the sticker has a tendency to disappear so you will have no idea what bike it belongs to. (This is the text on the front side, there is another one on the backside of better quality, but that one will tell you it is a 250sxf... as they use the same box for them all and reprogramme them at the KTM assembly plant where they fit the new crappy label) On your one you can still adjust the timing manually also by turning the plate the pick-up coil is fitted to. There will be one line on the casing and two on the plate. Stay inside the two on the plate and test where you get the best result.

I wrote a lenghty piece on KTM CDI's a year ago that you find in "General" and go to "Bike tips And Tricks" and click on "Axzon saved quotes" and it is in there.

Do a google and you will find the KTM wiring diagram you are after.

I had no idea you were planning to put the bike on the road! You will be the king of holeshots from traffic lights! :laugh2:
 
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