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:ROFLMAO:........ and the stories my cousin the pro bike mechanic has told me while he was employed by Kawasaki and Yamaha dealerships, could make you shiver in your boots........ but they have so many dealerships everywhere they are able to fix most issues before an owner has to seek legal recourse......

Oooohh, gotta add this one for fun - he had a Suzuki M109 making weird noises at slow speeds in 1st and 2nd gear........ Suzuki said 'do not pull it apart'....... cousin said 'here, listen to this' as he rode around holding his phone down by his left ankle...... the distributor kept stalling and blocking, but he knew the owner as a long term customer and went ahead and pulled the motor apart........ IT HAD NO RINGS ON THE PISTONS....... :eek:........ **** happens even on the super slick Jap assembly lines o_O....... someone had a Saki break and forgot to slip on some rings - shows how close the tolerances are if the motor will run without rings on pistons ;).

There are many others, but you get the idea.......

:D
 

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...did they put the rings on the pistons? Or did :eek: they substitute all the engine?
I was scratching my hair, then I realized what you mean't....... I haven't had my :coffee: yet........ :LOL:.......

Memory is a bit faded, but I suspect all it needed was a re-hone, maybe new pistons with the new rings..... but I remember the main complaint was that the Suzuki warranty manager was hard to get past....... but my cousin is a big bloke and was able to stand his ground on behalf of his customer.

(y)
 

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Totally agree guys. The fit and finish, and quality of the switchgear, placement/routing of cables, and the levers and controls on the SDR were of much higher quality than my Ducati. I didn't dislike my Ducati until they refused to cover a factory engine defect (bike was under warranty) and after it sat at the dealer for 60 days and STILL was not fixed, I filed a complaint with their corporate office, who did nothing. After that, I'd pretty much had enough of Ducati. My experience was its a premium price for sub-premium product and poor customer service. I still like some of their models (definitely not the new Monster though) but not sure I'd ever buy another one.
Please tell us how the story ends
 

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Such an awesome streetbike! Do you think it's well suited for twisties or is the power too much?
Is it the best for twisties? No, a sportsbike will do better with the shorter wheelbase and race ergos but it is still very capable and its fun as hell! I kept up with my buddy's s1000RR and passed up a couple liter bikes in the canyons. This is a bike that makes twisties a joy. One thing to note, practice your throttle control, That has been my 'training target' if you will.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
She is due 1st service in a week, so have been dodging the rain showers to get the k's up to 1000. 750 so far.

The difference in handling is amazing...on corners where I would have to back off on the GT, I just keep leaning on the R....HA! Wooo.

Of course, the engine is still tight, but...wow.

Did I mention the front brakes? Another wow...
 

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She is due 1st service in a week, so have been dodging the rain showers to get the k's up to 1000. 750 so far.

The difference in handling is amazing...on corners where I would have to back off on the GT, I just keep leaning on the R....HA! Wooo.

Of course, the engine is still tight, but...wow.

Did I mention the front brakes? Another wow...
I think comparisons of the current gen SDR with the past gen SDGT are interesting, but might be less relevant when the revised GT is released. Chassis-wise, the spy photos of the upcoming GT that were shown last year seemed to indicate the new GT will have the same frame, swingarm and rear suspension linkage as the R, but add a new rear subframe to accommodate luggage and passenger. Other than adding weight and maybe moving where the rider sits, rear subframes don't have a big impact on handling, so with essentially the same chassis, I would suspect (hope?) that the new GT will have pretty much the same handling characteristics as the new R.

The one verified wet weight I have seen online (2020 KTM 1290 Super Duke R | Road Test Review | Rider Magazine) for the 2020 SDR is 463 pounds. Even with extra weight for the rear subframe, additional GT bodywork and extra fuel, the GT should still be under 500 pounds wet (w/o luggage).
 

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Yes, but the other difference is suspension components. The GT gets electronic items, where the SDR get manual adjusters.
 

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Yes, but the other difference is suspension components. The GT gets electronic items, where the SDR get manual adjusters.
I guess it really depends on what kind of "electronic" suspension the GT gets. If the GT gets a semi-active system, than it could have a very different feel from the R. If its simply electronic adjustable suspension with the same geometry, then there will be a little added weight, but otherwise little difference. At least that's been the case with other bikes that have a manual and EAS version.

In the end, I am sure the extra weight and different ergos will make the GT not quite as sharp as the R, but my guess is it will be a close comparison and nowhere near as noticeable as going from old GT to new R. If I am right, then the SD GT may move to the top of my list.
 

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I loved the R I rode back in 2016. I'm sure I'd like the new one as well. But if I had either one, my diving privileges would live in constant jeopardy. They sort of do anyway, even with the GT.

I have to have something I can travel on and something to have fun on, rolled into one. Maybe it even makes me behave a little better. Sometimes.
 

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I loved the R I rode back in 2016. I'm sure I'd like the new one as well. But if I had either one, my diving privileges would live in constant jeopardy. They sort of do anyway, even with the GT.

I have to have something I can travel on and something to have fun on, rolled into one. Maybe it even makes me behave a little better. Sometimes.
My thinking has been the same as yours and I have been happy with my Multistrada 1200 in that role. I've got the new bike itch and the Multistrada keeps getting fatter and more touring oriented, so I'm moving in another direction. One option is the SD GT as a one-for-one replacement (upgrade?) for my Multistrada. The other option is to not try and have one bike to do everything and pick up a Tuono to park alongside the Multistrada. The Multistrada would be used for longer, multi-day rides and the Tuono for shorter day rides.
 

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I liked the Multi 12 I rode when they first came out.

Hopefully they fixed the seat.
I actually really like the stock seat on my 2013. 500+ miles of a slab in a day probably would be less than ideal, but for 300-350 miles/day on backroads, it's great.
 

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My thinking has been the same as yours and I have been happy with my Multistrada 1200 in that role. I've got the new bike itch and the Multistrada keeps getting fatter and more touring oriented, so I'm moving in another direction. One option is the SD GT as a one-for-one replacement (upgrade?) for my Multistrada. The other option is to not try and have one bike to do everything and pick up a Tuono to park alongside the Multistrada. The Multistrada would be used for longer, multi-day rides and the Tuono for shorter day rides.
Makes sense. Ill always have a Multi in the shed. I think they are a fantastic bike. I actually preferred my 2010 1200 Multi over my 2016 SD GT. I ended up selling my GT and 790 getting the 1290R, then sold my 2010 1200 multi and brought a 950S Multi. So have the comfortable sports bike and the do it all Multi.
 

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I'm just going to hard a$$ it on my R as the comfort difference from the R to gt can't be that much. A ride around the smokies including a few passes on the tail before the ride back to chicagoland was only regrettable when temps in the mtns dropped into 30's and now I have hand guards and warmers
 

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I'm just going to hard a$$ it on my R as the comfort difference from the R to gt can't be that much. A ride around the smokies including a few passes on the tail before the ride back to chicagoland was only regrettable when temps in the mtns dropped into 30's and now I have hand guards and warmers
I haven't completely ruled out the R, but I do hate messing around with soft luggage and for some reason visible aftermarket pannier frames really bother me, so I might miss the option for hard panniers as much as the slightly roomier ergos.
 
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