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It is a 1098 SF. Not as S - they're not worth the extra money. They have run-of-the-mill production Ohlins suspension and a very crude MTC system which would be impossibly intrusive on my bike, which has factory Ohlins TTX shock and K-Tech kork internals. It makes 162 bhp at the wheel and 92 ft/lb of torque (in stock form it was 141 and 79). It's been blue-printed and balanced, ported and flowed, compression increased, flywheel lightened and cams dialed. Has a Termi full system and runs a custom map.

I'm not comparing it to a 2020 SDR, but a gen 1 SDR because that's the bike I have and the model the OP is talking about.
 

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I'm not comparing it to a 2020 SDR, but a gen 1 SDR because that's the bike I have and the model the OP is talking about.
Pretty sure OP would have hard time picking up a new gen1 SDR and breaking it in in 2020. Almost certain he is on 2019 gen2. And awesome to know there is a lot of work on your SF!
 

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I think throttle response is one of those 'highly personal taste' categories of customization. I.e. no right answer for everyone. Isn't that what make motorcycles fun? Have the whole thing adjusted to fit specifically you.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Yes I did in fact pick up a gen2 2019. Got it a great discount for California prices. I do agree with the throttle mapping opinions too. I think that’s what it is for me. I actually really enjoy it when I’m just trying to get through town.
On another note... I told myself I wouldn’t, but I did it anyways. Same story every time - this is enough mods, I’ll leave it how it is for now, I wanna enjoy it stock...NOT!
Got this Remus exhaust, mid pipe and new gaskets off of a 2014 SDR with 750 miles on it. Talked the guy into $570. Black can and carbon tip, not a scratch on it.
The ‘14-‘19 exhaust all fit the same right? That’s what I gathered anyway. Hopefully!
 

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Yes I did in fact pick up a gen2 2019. Got it a great discount for California prices. I do agree with the throttle mapping opinions too. I think that’s what it is for me. I actually really enjoy it when I’m just trying to get through town.
On another note... I told myself I wouldn’t, but I did it anyways. Same story every time - this is enough mods, I’ll leave it how it is for now, I wanna enjoy it stock...NOT!
Got this Remus exhaust, mid pipe and new gaskets off of a 2014 SDR with 750 miles on it. Talked the guy into $570. Black can and carbon tip, not a scratch on it.
The ‘14-‘19 exhaust all fit the same right? That’s what I gathered anyway. Hopefully!
You need a servo-buddy to clear codes.
 

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Sometimes "arm-ripping power" is the product of a steeply spiked torque curve. LC8 motors have a flat torque curve that comes on early, hence the feeling of doing 65 when it's actually 95. A good example; a ZX-14 with 175 bhp doesn't feel as fast as a ZZR 1200 with 132 hp, but is actually much faster. I have owned both and the 12 is much more visceral and even scary. The 12's torque curve is much steeper, giving the feeling of power coming on in a big hit, while the 14's torque curve is flatter, comes on earlier and doesn't feel as fast as it actually is. I've owned both, and the 12 feels like being pushed in the back by the hand of God. The 14's power is smoother and like the KTM, doesn't feel like it's going as fast as it really is.
 

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All I keep thinking about on my 848SF is the main camshaft bearing failures - two in 4 years!
I said, godam! I've ridden Ducati's - loved it - but never owned one. Ever since the 851/888, camshaft and/or con rod bearing failure has been a concern on hard ridden L-twins. Regarding the more recent range of 848/1098/ L-twins, I hear lots of good stories and a hell of a lot of horror stories, especially on con rod failure and the cost of maintaining the desmo system. Ducati tuned the L-twin into a potential grenade, and little wonder the brand has shifted its superbikes to the V4 (which seems to be a much more durable engine). In comparison, the 1301 KTM motor feels undertuned and over engineered, which is why I think we don't hear of too many stories about the bottom end heaving its guts all over the road. And yes, if I had the money, I'd own the V4 streetfighter!
 

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I had both the 851/888 and spent a lot of time at the track. They both held up well for me but I was anal about maintenance though. My best friend ran the local Ducati shop and he actively raced Ducs and Moto Guzzis. Thankfully he gave me a heck of a discount to keep the valves in adjustment to I finally learned to do it myself. If it wasn't for his discounts I would have spent more money on maintaining them then I paid for them originally. I was riding/racing a lot and it seemed like every month I was needing to check/adjust the valves. I just got tired of the maintenance cost and time spent and drifted away from the brand for a while.

The new 1260 motors, and V4s got my attention. I have 2 bikes with their 1260 v-twins and they have been bulletproof so far. Thankfully the major services are way out there. I like that they sort of took the KTM 1290 approach; big v-twin, lots of grunt, and don't have to work it really hard to make power.

Personally, while there is a lot to like about the V4 Streetfighter I am glad I passed on it. It is way too much like the Panigale for the street. The only way you can really enjoy that motor on the street, is if you rev it to the moon, and at that speed you are going to jail for a long time if you get stopped. At least the KTM and a lot of the other v-twin Ducs you can enjoy very nicely in the 0-80 range.
 

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Finish the break in period, get the break in service done and twist it, all will be good!

I wanted the sound to match so I fell off the deep end with full Akro, pcv, Rotty airbox and dyno tune....have an "on all the time map" and a balanced map that's a bit more relaxing and usable like the stock bike ...good times, great bike
 

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I realize that coming from the FZ09 this SDR is a whole different beast. But what I don’t understand is how it feels somehow more slow...it most definitely is not though. On the freeway I feel like I’m doing 65 and I look down to see 95mph. I give it some juice in third and it lifts the front tire up, something my last bike could only do in first.
So I don’t get it, why did my fz09 feel like I had to hang on for dear life while getting in the freeway, but this SDR doesn’t? Is it the nice seat keeping me locked in?
I’m in the break-in period so I try not to go past 6.5k really, but I did wind it up till about 8.5k today. She def has some serious power, but not exactly what I was expecting. Do I just need to ride it harder to experience what that arm ripping power? When the break in is over of course.
I too came from a modded and flashed fz09 to the SDR. On the test ride from the dealer I was a little underwhelmed, the power didn't feel as robust in the lower rpm ranges. On the open road though I wrung it out a little and realized the bike has potential. Fast forward past break in, track and performance packs installed and then the Beast let me know what it was all about. Wring it out in 3rd to 4th in the twistys and you realize it has fearsome torque and acceleration. You can and need to ride it harder than the Yamaha. Take the time to learn with the bike and you will be rewarded. Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Haha right on!! Thanks fellas. I read a post on here from a while back - the guy said it pretty good IMO. Something like “it’s borderline more fun to mod out your machines than it is actually driving them.” Damn! For me it’s true anyway. Just need to relax and enjoy!
 

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Personally, while there is a lot to like about the V4 Streetfighter I am glad I passed on it. It is way too much like the Panigale for the street. The only way you can really enjoy that motor on the street, is if you rev it to the moon, and at that speed you are going to jail for a long time if you get stopped. At least the KTM and a lot of the other v-twin Ducs you can enjoy very nicely in the 0-80 range.
The V4 doesn't appeal to me. I thought it would on paper by the reality is it's a stripped track bike and everything about has been designed to shave lap times, which is irrelevant on the road and actually works against many the things that make a bike most enjoyable on the road, such as floating the front wheel out of every bend.
I still think Ducati missed a trick by not building a streetfighter with the 1299 engine. It didn't need 200 bhp. 170 bhp to match the opposition from KTM and Aprilia and a swelling mid-range would have done the job. Matched with the housefly handling of the Pani's chassis they'd have produced an Italian Superduke which could have been a market leader if they reined in the silly pricing.
 

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Years ago, when tires weren't what they are today, Ducatis came to prominence in roadracing and won races despite being "underpowered" compared to their 4-cylinder rivals. It was discovered that the "slip-and-grip" caused by the uneven firing impulses of a V-twin allowed the tire to relax between slip cycles and create more traction than a smoother, more powerful engine could manage. It also made them easier to ride fast, imparting the feeling that they weren't really all that fast compared to the 4's with their "arm-jerking" pipe-y powerbands. I think folks who, like myself, may have come from high-horsepower 4-cylinders are only perceiving less power and speed due to the different nature of a V-twin compared to an inline 4.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Very interesting. I’ll tell you what though, the more I ride this bike the more I realize how powerful it really is. Tried to do a wheelie in second gear yesterday, ended up doing a massive burn out instead. Need less throttle lol, not used to that!
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Yea I've lost the arse end a couple of times now, but that's more to do with chucking on the power coming out of a twisty. Definitely not a beginners bike.
No kidding. When I got the fz09 that forum all said it wasn’t a beginner bike. Been riding dirtbikes/sport atvs and sliding bmws around the neighborhoods for the past decade, figured it wouldn’t be too bad. And it wasn’t. But this bike....that’s another story. Good times.
 

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Go up two teeth on the rear sprocket of the Super Duke and it will have a whole new personalty. Before you had to ask it to play(if you asked it to play it would). After installing a 40 tooth rear sprocket it begged to be thrown around like a Hyperretard with a juice bottle.
 

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Why go up two at the rear instead of down one at the front? Increasing the size of the rear sprocket shortens the wheel base and makes it even more wheelie happy. Unless that's the intention of course.
 
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