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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Story: I needed a rear tire replacement so I took the rear wheel off myself and took it to cycle gear near me got the tire replaced and then I installed the wheel back. When I started riding it the next day, I noticed a slight lean towards the right but I didn't think much of it. Later, when trying to replace oil on my bike, I had to put it on the stand and I saw it was leaning quite a bit almost to the point where it seemed like it would fall off.

Trying to figure out what might be the cause:
  • stands look okay
  • wheel alignment should be okay (since i see the lean when stationary as well)
  • Cycle gear said that they did the wheel balancing
  • I didn't mess with the fork settings

Image attached shows a view from the rear while the bike is on the front stand.
 

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Strange. So it was leaning a little when riding, and the photo is how it is when on a front stand?? Then the only thing I can think of that would do that is the forks are uneven through the triple clamps. Can you measure from the top of each fork cap to the upper triple clamp and post your results? Also, when you put the rear wheel back on was it definitely flush against the swing arm axel before tightening it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Story: I needed a rear tire replacement so I took the rear wheel off myself and took it to cycle gear near me got the tire replaced and then I installed the wheel back. When I started riding it the next day, I noticed a slight lean towards the right but I didn't think much of it. Later, when trying to replace oil on my bike, I had to put it on the stand and I saw it was leaning quite a bit almost to the point where it seemed like it would fall off.

Trying to figure out what might be the cause:
  • stands look okay
  • wheel alignment should be okay (since i see the lean when stationary as well)
  • Cycle gear said that they did the wheel balancing
  • I didn't mess with the fork settings

Image attached shows a view from the rear while the bike is on the front stand.
For changing the rear tire, I had it on the rear stand. For diagnosing I tried both stands individually and together and each of those cases lean Is present.
In the picture I left it on the front stand for illustration purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Strange. So it was leaning a little when riding, and the photo is how it is when on a front stand?? Then the only thing I can think of that would do that is the forks are uneven through the triple clamps. Can you measure from the top of each fork cap to the upper triple clamp and post your results? Also, when you put the rear wheel back on was it definitely flush against the swing arm axel before tightening it?
Yes (to your first question)
I measured and it’s 9.75 inches (from the fork cap to the start of triple clamp on each side. Not 100% sure if this is what you asked)
Yes I believe it fit snug with swing arm axel before I tightened it.
 

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Yes (to your first question)
I measured and it’s 9.75 inches (from the fork cap to the start of triple clamp on each side. Not 100% sure if this is what you asked)
Yes I believe it fit snug with swing arm axel before I tightened it.
Trippy, very very trippy. I mean, it's got a lean of around 5 degrees - something is wayyyy out man, like seriously way out. And if, as you say, it also rides like that then I'd get it to a dealer ASAP and get them to figure out WITAF is going on. Can you take a photo from the front and also post that for us please?
 

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I don’t understand about the lean when riding. That suggests that the centre of gravity is WAY out, which as far as I can imagine cannot happen. Is your front stand bent or misaligned? The pin is canted front to back so if the stand is not perfectly aligned, it will impart a lean.
Why is there only one mirror? Was the bike dropped or crashed? Can you send a pic when it is on the rear stand? No one ever does front stand alone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The other mirror got lose. Bike never dropped or crashed.
One thing that comes to mind is that, when I was replacing the wheel I had asked a friend to keep the bike stable while I tighten/lose the socket. He was putting his weight down on the seat, standing on left looking to the right. He may have put too much weight and bent something.

I’m attaching the photo with the rear stand on.
 

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If you take a square and hold it to the vertical arm of your rear lifting gear, is it perpendicular to the ground? It looks bent to me. I can’t even imagine how it could be the bike.
 
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There's no way it's the bike, unless the trellis has been twisted way out of spec due to a big crash or missing mounting bolts. And the motor is also a stressed member, which gives the trellis incredible strength. So it has to be the stands, right?? You mentioned you torqued the rear wheel nut with your friend sitting on the bike (I'm guessing you had him stomp the rear brake) while the bike was on the stands. So, yes, at 250 or so nm of torque that would bend those paddock stand pins. This is why I keep my bike on the side stand when torqueing that godammed nut. But there's no way on this blessed Earth you'd bend the trellis out of shape. I have a 1/2 inch Milwaukee high torque impact wrench and even on full power it would probably destroy the axel threads but couldn't possibly damage the trellis. Yo' cannee break the laws of physics, Jimmy!
 

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If you take a square and hold it to the vertical arm of your rear lifting gear, is it perpendicular to the ground? It looks bent to me. I can’t even imagine how it could be the bike.
More importantly, is the axle insert portion parallel to the ground? I’m betting not: you’ve bent your stands. Your bike is almost certainly fine.
 

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There's no way it's the bike, unless the trellis has been twisted way out of spec due to a big crash or missing mounting bolts. And the motor is also a stressed member, which gives the trellis incredible strength. So it has to be the stands, right?? You mentioned you torqued the rear wheel nut with your friend sitting on the bike (I'm guessing you had him stomp the rear brake) while the bike was on the stands. So, yes, at 250 or so nm of torque that would bend those paddock stand pins. This is why I keep my bike on the side stand when torqueing that godammed nut. But there's no way on this blessed Earth you'd bend the trellis out of shape. I have a 1/2 inch Milwaukee high torque impact wrench and even on full power it would probably destroy the axel threads but couldn't possibly damage the trellis. Yo' cannee break the laws of physics, Jimmy!
My bet too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
When I was doing the tire replacement, the bike was only on the rear stand. I can see the rear stand might have bent due to “My friend”. However, to see if it was not the bike but only the rear stand, I situated it on the front one and that weird lean still showed up.

And when I ride, I have to balance the bike so that it won’t swerve to the right on its own. I didn’t have to do this before.

Any thoughts on how can I confirm that it’s not the bike?
 

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Humour me please. Check your stands.
You are fallible (no insult; so am I). Physics will not lie.

I simply cannot believe you found a way to bend your bike by doing what you have described. Are you Bruce Banner and your buddy pissed you off?
 
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Any thoughts on how can I confirm that it’s not the bike?
Since we've established that the only thing you can damage when tightening the rear nut is the nut and/or axel threads (by over tightening) or the stands, then you can safely assume there is no damage whatsoever to the chassis. If the rear wheel has not been put on properly and is not flush on the axel against the stops, then that would be the only possible way it will offset by such a large margin. Perhaps you could take the wheel off, double check everything, and put it back on ensuring everything's flush. So the bike's chassis is in my opinion straight. The only way to twist a chassis to the point where is leans at such an obvious angle is by high siding or hitting a solid object after a major crash. It's the stands.
 
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