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Remove the rear wheel,have a visual check on axle etc and reinstall. The stand is not strong enough to take the weight of a body off the ground. Torque the nut, bike on floor with a mate sitting on it, brakes on.
 

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I was hesitant to reply to this thread because I tend to look at the simplest possible solutions and end up looking stupid when I get it wrong. But here goes.

Is the floor level? 🤣

Second point of attention...

I have an off brand rear stand that does the same thing - Off the top of my head I've done about 3 tyre changes where it has taken numerous tries to either break the wheelnut free (these attempts were approximating extreme pain and crushing weight if the stand had feelings) or to torque it down (which is more of a love tap in comparison).

To keep it short, there have been instances where I've imparted a tremendous force and weight on the rear stand and my bike leans right in the exact same way as in that picture - though not quite that far yet. So using my impeccable reasoning skills, all this force has bent the rear stand downwards and its stance on its wheels is now slumped, and the angle of the pin that goes in the axle is now facing slightly below horizontal.

So this is the time to bust out the level and take measurements on the pin. If it's off, it's most likely not just the pin but the whole stand structurally.



If it's off, maybe it can be hammered straight after a liberal dose of the blowtorch...
 

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The Sanitized Comic
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Something to do with removing the wheel is where you should go back to.
Bent or not you don't require the stand when riding so let's eliminate that. I would remove wheel and check the fit where it mates to the flange, just to insure that there isn't an obstruction. In some of the pics it (the tire) looks like it is a little too far to the right ... too close to the muffler. Hard to tell exactly cus the tread doesn't have a center line.
 

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Did you sit on your bike when the bike was on the stands? ….or …..did you torque the wheel while on the stands?

IMHO there is no way the rear axle or swingarm is bent….I think trebor27 is right…you stands are bent …
 

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Be interesting to see OP's final conclusion. I'm not sure some of these "stands" are robust enough to bear up to the stress of torquing a rear wheel to 175 lbs/ft.

Might be wiser to snug up the axle nut, then lower to the ground before setting torque. That's what I do at any rate.
 

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What I did last tyre change was put the bike up on both stands, then when breaking the nut free I would just take the rear stand off so it'd be sitting only on it's front. All torque would actually be applied to the nut instead of sinking into the stand until it can't go any further. It was noticeably easier to get the nut free the first half turn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Im planning to undo the wheel and reinstall it tomorrow. I’ll get back with the results 😅

Only thing that makes me think it’s more than the stands is that while I was originally reinstalling the wheel I only had the rear stand on. I get that my rear stand might have bent out of shape but I don’t get why it leans when only on the front one. I didn’t use front one during the installation process at all. :/
 

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2021 1290 Super Duke R (Black)
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Dude: you’re not going to logic this out. The front stand is in my view likely to be a red herring. Or you bent it by putting the bike on the front stand alone, which I’ve never heard of anyone doing. I don’t see any way that a badly installed rear wheel can throw off the centre of gravity of the bike in the way you describe. I think your bike is fine and you have been tossed for a loop by a bent rear stand and some mistaken observations re-examined in hindsight.
Regardless, please let us all know what you find!
 

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None of your photos are very well lined up to the center of your bike, so parallax plays tricks, notice the yellow lines (near rear reflector) the difference in length is due to the off center camera position… but the crossed lines are approx perpendicular…
The green line is level to your rear reflector, the red line is as close as I could get to centered down the middle of your bike, they are both showing about 6 degrees from the photos level. Within +- 1 degree….

 

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^^^ Nailed it Trebor, stand is bent, the way they are built with all the load pulling it down one way it can only lean. Mine is similar, but i noticed on mine the wheels are at slight different positions where they are welded on. To get it sitting level, or vertical you could put a packer (piece of 12mm ply) on one side. or get the stand straightened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Hi Sorry for the late responses folks.

I'm looking for a another stand compatible with the bike to fully confirm that my front stand is also at fault. (100% agree that rear stand is bent).

I'm yet to undo the wheel and reinstall it.

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If we agree that the stands are reason for the bike to lean towards the right when static, what is causing it to lean to the right when riding it?

Here is my experience:
  1. Before the tire replacement, bike always rode in a straight line (with and without my hands on the handle bar) without needing any balancing
  2. After the tire replacement, unless I consciously balance the bike, it quickly starts going towards the right.
 

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It's truly weird. Is your front wheel perpendicular to your bars? Are your forks twisted? Were you riding on the right side of a crowned road, or the left side of a rutted road? Head bearing torqued right and not worn?

Also, is your chain the appropriate tightness? If anything has happened to the swing arm to push it off laterally, it will show up in an improperly tightened chain.
 

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If your wheels are out of line or anything twisted, you would notice when tipping the bike into corners, it would be hard to tip in and turn one way, and fall it rapidly the other way. camber of the road makes the bike pull one way. I doubt theres anything wrong with your bike, at worst it may need steering bearings tightened, its common for then to need a week up in the first few 1000 kms. Just get your rear stand fixed, blow torch and a pipe to fit over the pin should fix it.
 

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Hi Sorry for the late responses folks.

I'm looking for a another stand compatible with the bike to fully confirm that my front stand is also at fault. (100% agree that rear stand is bent).

I'm yet to undo the wheel and reinstall it.

--------------------------------------------------------

If we agree that the stands are reason for the bike to lean towards the right when static, what is causing it to lean to the right when riding it?

Here is my experience:
  1. Before the tire replacement, bike always rode in a straight line (with and without my hands on the handle bar) without needing any balancing
  2. After the tire replacement, unless I consciously balance the bike, it quickly starts going towards the right.
Good luck getting it sorted!
 
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