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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
augiedoggie, I can't seem to find the Freeride subforum, so if the mods can please move this to wherever it belongs, I would appreciate it.

Been riding my Freeride 250 (well, originally my wife's bike that I have commandeered...) a lot so figured I'd start a build thread. My bike is a 2016 US Freeride 250R and I ride Enduro/woods in the Texas area.

Performance:
  • KTM power parts map switch. See this thread for more details: https://www.ktmforums.com/forums/two-strokes/127052-2016-freeride-250r-us-map-switch.html
  • Rekluse Radius CX auto clutch
  • Dunlop AT81 EX tires.
  • Bib mousse
  • On the list for future: FMF fatty pipe and FMF power core muffler. Stock one is getting beat up now, will replace with FMF later.
  • On the list for future: Lektron carb.
  • On the list for future: Suspension respring and service. I am 145 lbs so I have been riding the bike as it came from factory so far. Eventually, I plan to get the suspension reworked. Most likely stiffened up just a tad.
Brakes:
  • Moto-master oversized rear caliper and oversized brake pads. The stock SX85 / baby caliper seazed on me and despite taking apart the caliper, blowing pistons out and cleaning, one piston was seized. Figured it was time to upgrade it anyway. Evaluated both the full brembo big bike upgrade kit and the moto-master setup. Went with the moto-master since it works with the stock rear brake cylinder, comes with bigger pads, and in future, is compatible with a bigger rear rotor kit that moto-master also sells. At $330, its a lot cheaper than a full brembo upgrade (almost $650-700 when you gather all the parts needed). Lot easier to install also.
  • Ox-brake left hand rear brake. I got the cable operated setup and think I would like not having to move my feet at all while on the trails.
  • On the list for future: Nihilo concepts stainless steel pistons for front brakes. I am going to leave the front brakes as they are, but just go with the stainless pistons.
Protection / cosmetic:
  • OEM rear subframe (over the rear fender). Makes it easy to pickup a downed bike on the trails.
  • Nihilo concepts frame protection stickers.
  • Polisport clutch case guard.
  • Polisport upper fork guards
  • Cycra wrap around hand protectors
  • Bullet proof designs radiator guards
  • KTM power parts aluminum skid plate. I did have to drill two holes in the bottom of it to help it drain better, as I noticed that after each wash, it would trap a bit of standing water in the bottom.
  • I would like to get some swingarm guards on the bike, but none of the polisport guards seem to fit the freeride. I found one company - Hyde designs - that makes freeride-specific swingarm guards, but its quite a bit of $$ to have it shipped from AUS/NZ. I hate watching the swingarm get all dinged up.
Maintenance:
  • The stock speedo console crapped out on me. Stopped working and then quickly disintegrated as I took it apart to check. Water had gotten into it. So I replaced it with the Trailtech endurance II. Its pretty much the same as stock, and stock had trailtech markings and part numbers on it anyway.
  • I took apart every connector I could get my hands on, and cleaned them and sealed them back up with marine di-electric grease. I am not impressed with the quality or durability of KTM's connectors. Hopefully this keeps them from corroding as fast.
  • I replaced the air filter with an OEM one after oiling.
  • Flushed and replaced the gearbox oil with Motorex 15-50 after the Rekluse install. I plan to replace oil every 4 rides and will just use Mobil 1 15-50 motor oil as its much more readily available locally.
Ergonomics:
  • Shaved the stock seat down an inch or so. I'm a small guy (5' 5") and ride very technical trails so the extra reach helps.
  • On the list for future: Some kind of rubber isolated footpegs to keep the vibes down. I almost never sit on the seat and ride standing up the whole day, and feel the motor vibrate quite a bit. I found two companies that make these, but they are pricey (~$250 or so).
  • Stegz pegs
I'm LOVING the bike so far. Very underrated motorcycle.
 

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Freeride club

Great thread:clap: looking forward to more details. Keep at it and be sure to post lots of pictures. Good stuff:grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
OK I have an update. My rear brake seized and even after taking apart the caliper, blowing pistons out, cleaning and reassembly one piston did not work. I evaluated the full brembo upgrade but when you priced out all the parts needed it was well over $600.

So I ordered a motomaster rear caliper - it works with the stock rear master cylinder and brake line and simply mounts in place. However, it provides slightly bigger pads with more contact area and down the line, is also compatible with motomaster's big rotor kit if I wanted more braking power. It has a nice magnetic pad retraction mechanism. Was $300 shipped from Australia and arrived within a week.

Next project is to install the ox-brake LHRB that already came in.
 

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Freeride lovers club

Great thread. There was some recent discussion on the subject due to newer versions produced as 4 stroke. Perhaps the freeride 2 smoker got shuffled to 2 stroke forum? Not sure. Anyways all great modifications outlined here. I’m sure those freerides are going to be a smash hit. Keep at it.
 

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Good stuff...

Great thread:clap: looking forward to more details. Keep at it and be sure to post lots of pictures. Good stuff:grin2:
Agreed.
Enjoyed not only all the photos but also all the details...
Excellent contribution to the KTM Forum.


Rangerman:ricky:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
OK, I installed the Ox-brake LHRB today. Seems like Ox-Brake has made some refinements to their design, compared to the model shown in their instructional videos on youtube. The cable perch is now integrated into the rear master cylinder cover (no more hose clamp), and the lever that bolts to the plunger re-uses the stock bolt and goes around the heim joint. Overall, it was a very straightforward install.

Took the opportunity to install a screw on left grip after tearing off the factory glued-on grip. Can't wait to try this out on the trails - hoping going downhill will be much easier now!
 

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Ox-Brake??? = Intriguing...

I must admit that I not only have never heard or known of the Ox-brake, I never knew such a thing even existed.
Very interesting concept in that my Mountain Bikes are setup with the rear brake/right lever and front brake/left lever.
My question would be why on a motorcycle would there be a need to actuate the rear brake with the left lever by hand rather than with the typical foot pedal already as the standard?
Just curious that's all.


Rangerman:whoop:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I must admit that I not only have never heard or known of the Ox-brake, I never knew such a thing even existed.
Very interesting concept in that my Mountain Bikes are setup with the rear brake/right lever and front brake/left lever.
My question would be why on a motorcycle would there be a need to actuate the rear brake with the left lever by hand rather than with the typical foot pedal already as the standard?
Just curious that's all.

Rangerman:whoop:
An LHRB is mostly only for folks that have a Rekluse or anti-stall clutch of some kind - allowing you to slow down the bike with the brake lever while the Rekluse slips the clutch for you. It helps with body position and bike control as you don't have to have the right foot move back and forth on the peg, you can keep it planted.

The intended benefit is in two primary use cases - this is just my opinion mind you, more experienced riders may want to chime in:


  • When you are going down very steep hills with obstacles or mud on the downhill slope, having your right foot planted on the pegs without having to move it to feather the rear brake helps with better bike control.
  • When you are riding through deeply rutted trails where you just don't have room to have your foot on the pegs and still want to slow down using the rear brake. No joke, there are several trails in the woods I ride in, where you have to have your butt on the seat and your feet up in the air because the bike itself barely fits through the ruts.
Also, I know there is a company in Australia (Clake?) that makes a combined clutch and rear brake lever, but that design pulls in the clutch when you pull in the LHRB thereby causing you to freewheel. I think I would prefer engine braking so an LHRB that is independent of clutch would be better, I think.
 

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Inquiring minds want to know...

Now I understand the Ox-brake.
An interesting experience for me was getting used to shifting and braking again after many years off from trail riding with my motocross (style) boots on.
I had to develop a sense or "feel" that was a bit foreign to me and difficult to get accustomed to at first.
The boots are so stiff and bulky unlike my boots that I wear for my other type of riding.
I am used to them now and appreciate the protection they afford me especially after smashing my right foot against a large rock on a nasty climb last year and having to say farewell to my big toe nail as a result (much better than a broken foot/ankle)...:yes:


Rangerman:flip:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK guys, been a while but I have been riding regularly! Recently installed Stegs Pegz and like them so far. Fairly subtle but positive change, allows you to grip the bike tighter with less conscious effort.

Just got new tires (Dunlop AT81 front and AT81EX rear) with bib mousse installed.
 

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Lookin' good...

OK guys, been a while but I have been riding regularly! Recently installed Stegs Pegz and like them so far. Fairly subtle but positive change, allows you to grip the bike tighter with less conscious effort.

Just got new tires (Dunlop AT81 front and AT81EX rear) with bib mousse installed.
How difficult was it to install the "moose tubes"?


Rangerman:ricky:
 

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LOVE this thread, thank you for putting together pics & writeups.

I want one of these Freerides so bad but will have to wait until next year unfortunately. My 250R is a blast but its the wrong color and going to need an expensive overhaul soon.

Do you know how heavy yours is approximately? Electric start?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
LOVE this thread, thank you for putting together pics & writeups.



I want one of these Freerides so bad but will have to wait until next year unfortunately. My 250R is a blast but its the wrong color and going to need an expensive overhaul soon.



Do you know how heavy yours is approximately? Electric start?
I've never weighed it or anything but the published wet weight is 199 lbs. It feels very light.
 

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I've never weighed it or anything but the published wet weight is 199 lbs. It feels very light.
xxaarraa thanks a ton for posting everything you've done to your Freeride - I have a 2017 and have made very few additions to it, but just purchased the FMF Turbin Core (for forrest riding Arizona) and the Fatty pipe. I also purchased a carbon skid plate (I am a converted mountain biker, and am trying to keep this bike as light as possible. One of the reasons I bought the Freeride was the weight, and the fact it was a two stroke with the ability to lug like a four-stroke. I'm going to follow your lead on the powermap switch (I do want to go a little faster on the straightaways to keep up with my buddies who are all riding bigger, faster bikes) and the carburetor. The only issues I've had is that after riding hot, or long distances, when stopping for a break the bike doesn't start back up? Not sure what the issue is and I did have to walk the bike out of the desert once. My dealer re-built the carb (or serviced it - said it was a known issue? Dunno about that). That said, I tend to lead the pack inevitably on all technical, mountain bike oriented trails and up hills because of this bike (it ain't me)...and I freaking love it. Rode this AM in 85 degree monsoon weather here in Arizona. Not another person out there and it was just epic. Thanks again, I will be following your lead.
 

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augiedoggie, I can't seem to find the Freeride subforum, so if the mods can please move this to wherever it belongs, I would appreciate it.

Been riding my Freeride 250 (well, originally my wife's bike that I have commandeered...) a lot so figured I'd start a build thread. My bike is a 2016 US Freeride 250R and I ride Enduro/woods in the Texas area.

Performance:
  • KTM power parts map switch. See this thread for more details: https://www.ktmforums.com/forums/two-strokes/127052-2016-freeride-250r-us-map-switch.html
  • Rekluse Radius CX auto clutch
  • Dunlop AT81 EX tires.
  • Bib mousse
  • On the list for future: FMF fatty pipe and FMF power core muffler. Stock one is getting beat up now, will replace with FMF later.
  • On the list for future: Lektron carb.
  • On the list for future: Suspension respring and service. I am 145 lbs so I have been riding the bike as it came from factory so far. Eventually, I plan to get the suspension reworked. Most likely stiffened up just a tad.
Brakes:
  • Moto-master oversized rear caliper and oversized brake pads. The stock SX85 / baby caliper seazed on me and despite taking apart the caliper, blowing pistons out and cleaning, one piston was seized. Figured it was time to upgrade it anyway. Evaluated both the full brembo big bike upgrade kit and the moto-master setup. Went with the moto-master since it works with the stock rear brake cylinder, comes with bigger pads, and in future, is compatible with a bigger rear rotor kit that moto-master also sells. At $330, its a lot cheaper than a full brembo upgrade (almost $650-700 when you gather all the parts needed). Lot easier to install also.
  • Ox-brake left hand rear brake. I got the cable operated setup and think I would like not having to move my feet at all while on the trails.
  • On the list for future: Nihilo concepts stainless steel pistons for front brakes. I am going to leave the front brakes as they are, but just go with the stainless pistons.
Protection / cosmetic:
  • OEM rear subframe (over the rear fender). Makes it easy to pickup a downed bike on the trails.
  • Nihilo concepts frame protection stickers.
  • Polisport clutch case guard.
  • Polisport upper fork guards
  • Cycra wrap around hand protectors
  • Bullet proof designs radiator guards
  • KTM power parts aluminum skid plate. I did have to drill two holes in the bottom of it to help it drain better, as I noticed that after each wash, it would trap a bit of standing water in the bottom.
  • I would like to get some swingarm guards on the bike, but none of the polisport guards seem to fit the freeride. I found one company - Hyde designs - that makes freeride-specific swingarm guards, but its quite a bit of $$ to have it shipped from AUS/NZ. I hate watching the swingarm get all dinged up.
Maintenance:
  • The stock speedo console crapped out on me. Stopped working and then quickly disintegrated as I took it apart to check. Water had gotten into it. So I replaced it with the Trailtech endurance II. Its pretty much the same as stock, and stock had trailtech markings and part numbers on it anyway.
  • I took apart every connector I could get my hands on, and cleaned them and sealed them back up with marine di-electric grease. I am not impressed with the quality or durability of KTM's connectors. Hopefully this keeps them from corroding as fast.
  • I replaced the air filter with an OEM one after oiling.
  • Flushed and replaced the gearbox oil with Motorex 15-50 after the Rekluse install. I plan to replace oil every 4 rides and will just use Mobil 1 15-50 motor oil as its much more readily available locally.
Ergonomics:
  • Shaved the stock seat down an inch or so. I'm a small guy (5' 5") and ride very technical trails so the extra reach helps.
  • On the list for future: Some kind of rubber isolated footpegs to keep the vibes down. I almost never sit on the seat and ride standing up the whole day, and feel the motor vibrate quite a bit. I found two companies that make these, but they are pricey (~$250 or so).
  • Stegz pegs
I'm LOVING the bike so far. Very underrated motorcycle.
XXAARRAA - have you seen this carb for the Freeride? https://technologyelevated.com/product/28mm-sc2-smartcarb/
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Been a while since I posted, but I have been riding the FR regularly and loving it! I outgrew the rear brakes a while ago and recently upgraded to a bigger rotor setup. Since I already have the moto master bigger caliper, I went with the oversized rear rotor and caliper spacer kit.

70010060000KTM Rear Brake Disc 230mm 85 SX / FreeRide 13-15
Moto-Master Adapter Kit - 220mm Oversize

It is common on the FR to upgrade the rear rotor to a 220 mil, however, I found that 230 mil rotor on KTM powerparts. Since the rotor is bigger than designed for the caliper spacer kit, I just added some washers to space out the caliper even further.

I haven't ridden the bike since I did this (bought a 2020 Beta 250RR that I have been riding) so I will post a review of the better braking performance after I do.

Oh, after a whole year of riding this bike, someone pointed out to me that moving the handlebar back one stop would help. I did that, moved it to the nearest mount hole and man what a difference. Bike "feels" a lot more agile and smaller. The beta 250 is awesome, but I still love the freeride and keeping it and will be riding it as well.

94053
 
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