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I'm new to dirt bikes and found a "1996" 300 exc, so I bought it. Guy said front fork seals need replacing and even gave me a new set. After some homework I'm not sure its a 96. The seals he gave me are 40mm and from my research, 96 300s are 45mm. I cant find the VIN. on the front the only thing that resembles a VIN is KTM931089753. I know its a 300 because the engine code matches a 300, 546 30 305 400.

Any way to help me figure this out?
98935
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Discussion Starter #2
I'm new to dirt bikes and found a "1996" 300 exc, so I bought it. Guy said front fork seals need replacing and even gave me a new set. After some homework I'm not sure its a 96. The seals he gave me are 40mm and from my research, 96 300s are 45mm. I cant find the VIN. on the front the only thing that resembles a VIN is KTM931089753. I know its a 300 because the engine code matches a 300, 546 30 305 400.

Any way to help me figure this out?
View attachment 98935 View attachment 98936 View attachment 98937
 

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I'm new to dirt bikes and found a "1996" 300 exc, so I bought it. Guy said front fork seals need replacing and even gave me a new set. After some homework I'm not sure its a 96. The seals he gave me are 40mm and from my research, 96 300s are 45mm. I cant find the VIN. on the front the only thing that resembles a VIN is KTM931089753. I know its a 300 because the engine code matches a 300, 546 30 305 400.

Any way to help me figure this out?
View attachment 98935 View attachment 98936 View attachment 98937
Welcome to forum.

546 casings were used in 250 - 380 2 strokers from 90 - 98.(The cc's should be stamped on the cylinder)
Your frame number tells us that the bike was manufactured in October 1993.(9310) Rest of the number is a serial number.

I can not find the 93 forks, but the 94 forks are USD Marzocci and have 40mm seals.

The 96 forks are "conventional" Marzocci forks and use 45mm seals.
 
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Dirt Wizard
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Axe is right. The 96-97 exc had conventional forks not upside down. My 360 definitely did. Not that it matters, but the plastics look a little off and wrong colour. Definitely looks like an earlier 93/94.
I will put up a pic of my 96 360 exc. I did remove the headlight and it had a fatty on it, but the rest was pretty standard.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The front plastics are new. Here's my dilemma, no one in my area (STL) will service my bike. The only place that said he would basically said "ill give it a shot". Didnt make me feel good about paying him $150 for doing the work. I have the seals and dust covers. I know KTM takes special tools, is there any help/advice you all can provide?
 

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So are we still talking about replacing the fork seals, or are we talking about a general service?

If this is about the fork seals, then you have a set of USD (Upside Down) forks. And we think the 40mm seals are for them. I assume you are not confident enough to try the job of replacing the fork seals your self. USD forks are a little trickier when it comes to replacing the seals. But it is doable.

The way I see it you have four options:
1. Do the job yourself. It is not rocket science. But if you have never done them on a set of USD forks you could struggle.
2. Allow the guy who said "I'll give it a shot" a chance to prove how good he is. Ask him if he has done any USD forks before. If the answer is "NO" then perhaps not. But if he has done USD forks before I expect that he knows how they work.
3. Find someone who works with classic bikes and has done similar ones before.
4. Send the forks to a suspension workshop/bike workshop that focuses on suspension work.

Who ever does the job will also need to know what viscosity fork oil your forks use so it can be replaced with the correct one. And how much oil to use.
 

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Fork seal change is not overly complicated for most of us but some forks require a special tool for damage free disassembly and proper damage free assembly of seals. When cost of proper tools versus risk of damage is factored it makes a strong argument to have your seals replaced by an EXPERIENCED professional with the proper tools for the job. No room for guesswork or inexperienced optimism. If you cannot find a competent suspension shop, you can ship your forks to one of the many quality suspension shops that can do the work correctly. WER is one of the better shops on east coast. Most quality shops will refuse to replace seals without properly disassembling forks for inspection and possible rebuild. Replacing fork seals without replacing bushings and cleaning fork internals and changing fork oil is a waste of money. Worn bushings and dirty oil will have your new seals leaking in short order. Do it right the first time or save your money.
 
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