KTM Forums banner
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just recently bought a 2006 (I think) ktm 125sx. And I’ll include pics but the bike is super clean and doesn’t have any leaks and runs great and spark plug read perfect and always starts first kick cold. I was told it had a full top and bottom end engine rebuild and I believe the guy because if you look at the engine you can tell the gaskets are brand new. I can’t see the vin number because he sandblasted and powder coated the frame black. My concern about the year of the bike is because on the plastic chain roller piece it says “07 ktm” so now I’m thinking it’s an 07. I have the engine number and I’ll send a pic of that I don’t know how to read that. And now also today I just changed the transmission oil and it has 2 drain bolts and if u were sitting on the bike I drained the right side first and then I took the left side bolt off and nothing came out and it’s a magnetic bolt and it looks like it had a little too much for comfort metal shavings. (See pics) I’ll also include a pic of the old oil. It has like these weird bubbles in it. so now I’m just concerned about the bike. Let me know your thoughts if I bought junk. Thanks!




 

·
Dirt tracker
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
Nice looking bike. Looks good from here. Could be your previous owner used second magnetic drain plug. Usually use one on kicker side of motor. Don't fuss over small amount of metal in drained oil. Put a paint strainer in a funnel and drain trans oil into strainer to catch any drained particles. Change trans oil every 4-6 hours of run time. Check back as needed for assistance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
yeah, sorry i only partly agree with the last guy, as the metal on the plug looks bad to me, being a transmission mechanic. the size of the flakes there is definitely not normal wear. it should look more like a paste.

we need more info... first, any idea when the oil was changed last? has it been changed since the last rebuild as per the sellers info? first oil changes can be hard to read. the blackness and those bubbles you mentioned, which is metal in the oil, tells us its been too long since the last change. if it were me i would change it every 3 hours just to see if its coming apart. if you get flakes like that in 3 hours you have a problem.

if it was just rebuilt and a past failure was fixed, this metal could be from a poor rebuild cleaning job, ie, not a current problem. thus flushing it often should clear things up. if the guy missed something and its still failing, you need to find out and get it back apart before it blows up and gets expensive. if the oil looks ok after a couple times, then go longer after that but keep an eye on it. i also suggest draining the opposite plug first each time to get to know the motor sump quantities and help flush stuff out. get a small magnet and go fishing in the drain holes for bigger chunks each time. if you find anything at all then get the engine apart to see why.

as for the frame VIN issue, call a good dealer (even if its in a different state) and see if the engines were specific to the model year. they may tell you the year from that engine number.

lastly, a lot of guys run their chains too tight and it quickly stretches them out. to get to know this bike and find a good setting to copy when the wheel is all the way down, first lean over the seat from the right side and pull the swing arm up with one hand while checking chain tension with the other. at the greatest radius arc (tightest chain) the chain should never be firmly tight. it should always have a little give. set the axle distance to get this right, then use something to measure chain slop with the wheel fully lowered, and use that dimension for future adjustments. have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah, sorry i only partly agree with the last guy, as the metal on the plug looks bad to me, being a transmission mechanic. the size of the flakes there is definitely not normal wear. it should look more like a paste.

we need more info... first, any idea when the oil was changed last? has it been changed since the last rebuild as per the sellers info? first oil changes can be hard to read. the blackness and those bubbles you mentioned, which is metal in the oil, tells us its been too long since the last change. if it were me i would change it every 3 hours just to see if its coming apart. if you get flakes like that in 3 hours you have a problem.

if it was just rebuilt and a past failure was fixed, this metal could be from a poor rebuild cleaning job, ie, not a current problem. thus flushing it often should clear things up. if the guy missed something and its still failing, you need to find out and get it back apart before it blows up and gets expensive. if the oil looks ok after a couple times, then go longer after that but keep an eye on it. i also suggest draining the opposite plug first each time to get to know the motor sump quantities and help flush stuff out. get a small magnet and go fishing in the drain holes for bigger chunks each time. if you find anything at all then get the engine apart to see why.

as for the frame VIN issue, call a good dealer (even if its in a different state) and see if the engines were specific to the model year. they may tell you the year from that engine number.

lastly, a lot of guys run their chains too tight and it quickly stretches them out. to get to know this bike and find a good setting to copy when the wheel is all the way down, first lean over the seat from the right side and pull the swing arm up with one hand while checking chain tension with the other. at the greatest radius arc (tightest chain) the chain should never be firmly tight. it should always have a little give. set the axle distance to get this right, then use something to measure chain slop with the wheel fully lowered, and use that dimension for future adjustments. have fun!
yeah, sorry i only partly agree with the last guy, as the metal on the plug looks bad to me, being a transmission mechanic. the size of the flakes there is definitely not normal wear. it should look more like a paste.

we need more info... first, any idea when the oil was changed last? has it been changed since the last rebuild as per the sellers info? first oil changes can be hard to read. the blackness and those bubbles you mentioned, which is metal in the oil, tells us its been too long since the last change. if it were me i would change it every 3 hours just to see if its coming apart. if you get flakes like that in 3 hours you have a problem.

if it was just rebuilt and a past failure was fixed, this metal could be from a poor rebuild cleaning job, ie, not a current problem. thus flushing it often should clear things up. if the guy missed something and its still failing, you need to find out and get it back apart before it blows up and gets expensive. if the oil looks ok after a couple times, then go longer after that but keep an eye on it. i also suggest draining the opposite plug first each time to get to know the motor sump quantities and help flush stuff out. get a small magnet and go fishing in the drain holes for bigger chunks each time. if you find anything at all then get the engine apart to see why.

as for the frame VIN issue, call a good dealer (even if its in a different state) and see if the engines were specific to the model year. they may tell you the year from that engine number.

lastly, a lot of guys run their chains too tight and it quickly stretches them out. to get to know this bike and find a good setting to copy when the wheel is all the way down, first lean over the seat from the right side and pull the swing arm up with one hand while checking chain tension with the other. at the greatest radius arc (tightest chain) the chain should never be firmly tight. it should always have a little give. set the axle distance to get this right, then use something to measure chain slop with the wheel fully lowered, and use that dimension for future adjustments. have fun!
I was told the engine had around 5 hours on the new rebuild. The oil seems way too dark for only 5 hours…I’ll check the oil again like u said and keep changing it to see if I continue to get these shavings. I also have a theory if it is true what he said about rebuilding it then those shavings could be from the motor break in? Or is that nonsense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah, sorry i only partly agree with the last guy, as the metal on the plug looks bad to me, being a transmission mechanic. the size of the flakes there is definitely not normal wear. it should look more like a paste.

we need more info... first, any idea when the oil was changed last? has it been changed since the last rebuild as per the sellers info? first oil changes can be hard to read. the blackness and those bubbles you mentioned, which is metal in the oil, tells us its been too long since the last change. if it were me i would change it every 3 hours just to see if its coming apart. if you get flakes like that in 3 hours you have a problem.

if it was just rebuilt and a past failure was fixed, this metal could be from a poor rebuild cleaning job, ie, not a current problem. thus flushing it often should clear things up. if the guy missed something and its still failing, you need to find out and get it back apart before it blows up and gets expensive. if the oil looks ok after a couple times, then go longer after that but keep an eye on it. i also suggest draining the opposite plug first each time to get to know the motor sump quantities and help flush stuff out. get a small magnet and go fishing in the drain holes for bigger chunks each time. if you find anything at all then get the engine apart to see why.

as for the frame VIN issue, call a good dealer (even if its in a different state) and see if the engines were specific to the model year. they may tell you the year from that engine number.

lastly, a lot of guys run their chains too tight and it quickly stretches them out. to get to know this bike and find a good setting to copy when the wheel is all the way down, first lean over the seat from the right side and pull the swing arm up with one hand while checking chain tension with the other. at the greatest radius arc (tightest chain) the chain should never be firmly tight. it should always have a little give. set the axle distance to get this right, then use something to measure chain slop with the wheel fully lowered, and use that dimension for future adjustments. have fun!
And yep I adjusted the chain that’s the first thing I did when I got it. It was actually too loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yeah, sorry i only partly agree with the last guy, as the metal on the plug looks bad to me, being a transmission mechanic. the size of the flakes there is definitely not normal wear. it should look more like a paste.

we need more info... first, any idea when the oil was changed last? has it been changed since the last rebuild as per the sellers info? first oil changes can be hard to read. the blackness and those bubbles you mentioned, which is metal in the oil, tells us its been too long since the last change. if it were me i would change it every 3 hours just to see if its coming apart. if you get flakes like that in 3 hours you have a problem.

if it was just rebuilt and a past failure was fixed, this metal could be from a poor rebuild cleaning job, ie, not a current problem. thus flushing it often should clear things up. if the guy missed something and its still failing, you need to find out and get it back apart before it blows up and gets expensive. if the oil looks ok after a couple times, then go longer after that but keep an eye on it. i also suggest draining the opposite plug first each time to get to know the motor sump quantities and help flush stuff out. get a small magnet and go fishing in the drain holes for bigger chunks each time. if you find anything at all then get the engine apart to see why.

as for the frame VIN issue, call a good dealer (even if its in a different state) and see if the engines were specific to the model year. they may tell you the year from that engine number.

lastly, a lot of guys run their chains too tight and it quickly stretches them out. to get to know this bike and find a good setting to copy when the wheel is all the way down, first lean over the seat from the right side and pull the swing arm up with one hand while checking chain tension with the other. at the greatest radius arc (tightest chain) the chain should never be firmly tight. it should always have a little give. set the axle distance to get this right, then use something to measure chain slop with the wheel fully lowered, and use that dimension for future adjustments. have fun!
Those metal shavings are magnetic. Would u guess they’re from the clutch? Can’t imagine those coming off any gears unless it’s that clapped…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Nice looking ride! I like how you got it a bed to keep it comfy ;)

Not that I'm an expert (far from it lol). I'd change the oil, ride it for an hour or 4 and check it again. That way you KNOW how long the oil has been in there and have a good starting point. Also you know what KIND of oil is in it.

Good luck and congrats!
 

·
Dirt tracker
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
I didn't feel too bad about that bit of swarf on drain plug. It always looks worse when it follows magnetic field and looks like shrapnel. Grab that mess with a paper towel and rub it between your fingers to feel how big particles are. Your transmission produces wear particles from its steel parts. Bearings and gears produce magnetic wear particles. Stock clutch wear particles are not magnetic. Aftermarket clutch is anyone's guess. I'm not concerned with that bit of trash on that magnet. Run it and keep fresh oil in there. See our forum search here for identification of your Vin number
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kranjack19

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yeah, sorry i only partly agree with the last guy, as the metal on the plug looks bad to me, being a transmission mechanic. the size of the flakes there is definitely not normal wear. it should look more like a paste.

we need more info... first, any idea when the oil was changed last? has it been changed since the last rebuild as per the sellers info? first oil changes can be hard to read. the blackness and those bubbles you mentioned, which is metal in the oil, tells us its been too long since the last change. if it were me i would change it every 3 hours just to see if its coming apart. if you get flakes like that in 3 hours you have a problem.

if it was just rebuilt and a past failure was fixed, this metal could be from a poor rebuild cleaning job, ie, not a current problem. thus flushing it often should clear things up. if the guy missed something and its still failing, you need to find out and get it back apart before it blows up and gets expensive. if the oil looks ok after a couple times, then go longer after that but keep an eye on it. i also suggest draining the opposite plug first each time to get to know the motor sump quantities and help flush stuff out. get a small magnet and go fishing in the drain holes for bigger chunks each time. if you find anything at all then get the engine apart to see why.

as for the frame VIN issue, call a good dealer (even if its in a different state) and see if the engines were specific to the model year. they may tell you the year from that engine number.

lastly, a lot of guys run their chains too tight and it quickly stretches them out. to get to know this bike and find a good setting to copy when the wheel is all the way down, first lean over the seat from the right side and pull the swing arm up with one hand while checking chain tension with the other. at the greatest radius arc (tightest chain) the chain should never be firmly tight. it should always have a little give. set the axle distance to get this right, then use something to measure chain slop with the wheel fully lowered, and use that dimension for future adjustments. have fun!
Did a bit of looking and the first number is the year of engine manufacture. So the engines a 2009 but the guy said it’s a 2006? This is a mess
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
copy that. the oil did look like more then 5 hrs. break-in can look bad. but then unless we know what failed before and how far they took it apart, it's too hard to say. metal like that only comes from the gears or bearing. but unless its really abused with miss shifts at hi revs, i don't normally see gears shedding metal. so i still think it's a worry. "augiedoggie" has a good tip there about feeling the shrapnel after its wiped off. i would use a 6 mil nitryl glove so a towel doesn't get in the way, and you can still feel the bumps if the chunks are big. he is right that the way it looks on the magnet can be deceiving.

on the frame issue, there are types of guys out there who just don't follow things like year models well at all... just it being an 09 not an 06, could make sense just in how the guy remembered some vague number, but upside down. heh. if so, your theory on the "07" stamped in the plastic would make more sense, cuz the parts are always older than the year model. anyway, i would believe KTM and expect it to be an 09.

tell us how it shifts when you ride it. from my experience its hard to tell when the gear-train is failing. once my 125's PTO bearing was nearly gone and i only caught it at oil change... actually looked similar to what you showed. but the bearing cage had broke off and chunks of it showed up in places. come to think of it, if a bearing is failing the chunks wont be big. hmm... here is another idea for you...

have a buddy run the bike on a stand while you listen to the motor. outside, not in a garage. very low idle, different gears. but not to test each gear, just to find the best speed/harmonic for a sound to show up. listen for a whirring singing sound that could be a failed bearing. if you hear something, then try to isolate its speed to the engine RPM (crank) or the chain speed (gear-shaft bearings). maybe trying it on a different bike could help.

NAPA sells an automotive stethoscope made just for this. but a long slim screwdriver with the handle held up to the base of your ear works almost as well. be patient as it takes a while to figure out what you're hearing. and note that its almost more about feeling vibrations than hearing noises.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,069 Posts
Welcome to the forum!

  • Your motor is a 1999, 2009 or a 2019. (But I am pretty sure it is a 2009)
  • The metal on the drain plug magnet is about what I would expect after approx 30 hours of use and no oil change. As the clutch basket is alloy you will not get any of that on the magnet. (We tend to replace the oil after 2 MX race days.)
  • The VIN# is on the right side of the steering neck tube. Sand away some of the paint/powder coating and you will find it. Then re-paint that part, or tape over with clear tape.
  • Empty motor of oil. (Just leave the drain plug out and let the oil drain in to a bucket.). Buy some new oil and fill up until it starts dribbling out from the inspection hole on the r/h side of the motor (take off the inspection-hole-bolt at the back of the r/h side of the motor below the kick).

Any other issues just come back and we will help you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Welcome to the forum!

  • Your motor is a 1999, 2009 or a 2019. (But I am pretty sure it is a 2009)
  • The metal on the drain plug magnet is about what I would expect after approx 30 hours of use and no oil change. As the clutch basket is alloy you will not get any of that on the magnet. (We tend to replace the oil after 2 MX race days.)
  • The VIN# is on the right side of the steering neck tube. Sand away some of the paint/powder coating and you will find it. Then re-paint that part, or tape over with clear tape.
  • Empty motor of oil. (Just leave the drain plug out and let the oil drain in to a bucket.). Buy some new oil and fill up until it starts dribbling out from the inspection hole on the r/h side of the motor (take off the inspection-hole-bolt at the back of the r/h side of the motor below the kick).

Any other issues just come back and we will help you.
So you think previous owner was lying abt the hours? He said it had around 5 on the new engine but seeing oil like that…idk. All the gaskets are brand new unless he took the motor apart and only put new gaskets in lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Welcome to the forum!

  • Your motor is a 1999, 2009 or a 2019. (But I am pretty sure it is a 2009)
  • The metal on the drain plug magnet is about what I would expect after approx 30 hours of use and no oil change. As the clutch basket is alloy you will not get any of that on the magnet. (We tend to replace the oil after 2 MX race days.)
  • The VIN# is on the right side of the steering neck tube. Sand away some of the paint/powder coating and you will find it. Then re-paint that part, or tape over with clear tape.
  • Empty motor of oil. (Just leave the drain plug out and let the oil drain in to a bucket.). Buy some new oil and fill up until it starts dribbling out from the inspection hole on the r/h side of the motor (take off the inspection-hole-bolt at the back of the r/h side of the motor below the kick).

Any other issues just come back and we will help you.
here’s a pic of the engine. I took the exhaust off bc it was leaking and I had to put a new gasket in….
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,069 Posts
Well it should be a newly rebuilt engine not 13 years old.. are marks like that possible after 5 hours of run time on a new piston?
I would say "NO". But it depends on how the bore looks like... Did he say he had done something to the bore?
 

·
Dirt tracker
Joined
·
3,761 Posts
That's quite a bit of carbon in that exhaust port to claim 5 hours run time. Reckon it could have been rich oil ratio and perhaps they were telling stories about the hours. It's hard for me to accept that story. I wouldn't be the one to call your seller a liar, but that picture looks more like 40-60 hours run time for those piston scratches and carbon deposits. None of your pictures should discourage you. You still have an awesome bike. Your seller may have given you a bit more of a story about the hours but the bike still looks like a keeper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That's quite a bit of carbon in that exhaust port to claim 5 hours run time. Reckon it could have been rich oil ratio and perhaps they were telling stories about the hours. It's hard for me to accept that story. I wouldn't be the one to call your seller a liar, but that picture looks more like 40-60 hours run time for those piston scratches and carbon deposits. None of your pictures should discourage you. You still have an awesome bike. Your seller may have given you a bit more of a story about the hours but the bike still looks like a keeper.
well then it’ll probably need a rebuild soon no? It starts first kick that’s a good sign right? Lol
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top