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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I’m sure many of you have seen this but posting as a reminder - so easy to do without any tools or mess.

I came across this video and decided to try it with my phone flashlight behind the clear reservoir. I was surprised how many air bubbles come up. Now I didn’t feel there was excessive play/travel before clutch disengagement before doing this, so I was really surprised what I witnessed. Nor do I feel like the bike wants to roll forward when the clutch is pulled in

I did this for a few minutes until no more bubbles came out and I did it with the handle bars in both lock positions.

Once I was done, there was no perceptible difference in the lever feel.

I’ll take it out for a ride later today to see if there is any difference.

 

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Slick trick! Simple and brilliant. Well done!
 

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Yup that's a good old trick from way back but he didn't mention to turn the bars hard right (for clutch) tho it is the way he shows it. Another trick we did after replacing brake fluid was to rap the brake lines with the handle of a screwdriver while pumping the lever just a little... starting at the bottom. Holding the lever with a rubber band or strap against the grip over night sometime works the worst of it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Went for a ride and the clutch is operating normally however this procedure definitely took some slack out of the lever (wasn’t obvious while not riding) as now I’ll have to adjust the lever to be closer to the bar.

I’m going to investigate a method to clean out the clutch oil jet that doesn’t involve it’s removal. I’ve read enough to know you can make things worse if things don’t go right. I’ll post a separate thread once I source an inexpensive tool.
 

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Ha! As soon as I read the title I wondered if it was the ol’ flick trick. Certain mountain bike disc brakes were particularly difficult to bleed thoroughly -cough*Magura*cough-.. It also proved helpful on Hayes, Avid, Hope, Shimano etc, just wasn’t always necessary.

Sometimes I found it necessary to angle the bars/lever upward so the MC was more vertical to help drive the bubbles upward into the MC reservoir port.

I ultimately devised the same method however included smacking the line sharply with a screwdriver handle while flicking the lever (as Spartacus mentioned above). I suspected air was being trapped somewhere in the fittings or in the entrance to the MC body, whatever the case, this method solves it and I had many compliments from friends and customers that they were the best feeling brakes they’d ever had.

Thanks for the tip!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah - I stumbled across this video years ago but again recently and posted it. I like the process “enhancement” with tapping the line!
 
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