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Knocked off work a bit early today,
so...

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Riding the fields and along the tracks.

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Farmlands USA.

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Rangerman
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Rangerman
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Rangerman
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Rangerman
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Quite possibly the most unusual KTM ever?

AMP Research 125 KTM (1990)
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I came across this very interesting article that was written recently.
It was about a man named Horst Leitner.
He designed a prototype for KTM.
It is definitely worth reading about.
Very interesting indeed.

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Rangerman
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I remember when that stuff was new tech. ATK was slick and innovative design of the brilliant Horst Leitner( not sure correct spelling) the dirt bike press shredded his ideas as unworkable but the theory was amazing. ATK was acronym for german translation Anti Torque Kette. My poor translation but kette is chain in german. The design used 2 mounted sprockets above and below counter shaft sprocket to prevent rotational drive torque to impart torque reaction to rear suspension under acceleration to allow an improved suspension tuning ability due to drive chains inability to pull suspension around when accelerating. His early signature bikes also used a countershaft mounted rear disc brake to reduce braking reactions to influence suspension action. All brilliant ideas that never garnered mainstream acceptance in dirt bike world but still very interesting concepts
 
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Speaking of ATK's...
Nice one!

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There was another "made in the USA" dirt bike in the early 2000's and being a cyclists (mountain bike specifically) I was familiar with the manufacturer already.
Cannondale.

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Here is an interesting article about their rise and fall.

And to think that as a teenager I thought that Hodaka's were made in the states!
Oregon to be exact.
None other than the Combat Wombat!

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Rangerman
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Cannondale motorcycles were innovative bikes that were destined for failure due to overly optimistic expectations of the manufacturer. They tried to develop the world's best motorcycle on their first attempt and hemorrhaged enough money to nearly bankrupt their profitable bicycle business. BMW tried to break into dirt bike market with brilliant tech and too high an expectation also and didn't understand development required trial and error and long term investments. Tough market for upstarts when your investors want near immediate results and profits. Wrong business for that plan. Hodaka was a cool brand and built simple and durable bikes, but I'm pretty sure they were imported from Japan and the importer was in US. I kind of remember the name PABATCO was the importer and it was an acronym for their corporate namesake. Hodaka bikes were super cheap and super durable. Couldn't kill their engines and cylinders were hard chrome lined and bulletproof. Never fast or fancy, but they were popular bikes for a few years. Hard to restore them because most of the surviving Hodakas refused to die and were ridden into the ground. Parts became scarce and super expensive
 
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Mystery Rider?

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Someone I know just learned how to ride a motorcycle today!


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I took a ride today on the '07 1st Gen to a local lake we have fished at before in past years.

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It was a nice day to pack a lunch and just enjoy the views.

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The KLR is always an enjoyable ride regardless of where I ride to.
Out of all the motorcycles I have owned or ridden it is my all time favorite!
(The EXC comes in a close second though!)


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A different way of two up riding...
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Rangerman
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Rangerman & The Mystery Rider!
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Hello Rangerman,

This thread has been nothing but a joy to read, watching that old and rusty KTM come back to life has been an inspiration, and actually pushed me to go find my '94 EXC 300 that I used to ride as a teenager and give it a second chance. After about 2 hours of looking everywhere at my parents' house, I found it!

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It is in a really bad shape but I'm sure I can get it to run again.

Do you know if the manuals shared here ('92 EXC) will work with it? I have been looking for the '94 manuals but can't seem to find those anywhere.
 

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Good evening Asfalter,
I am glad to hear that my thread has benefited you in this way.
I have really enjoyed the journey that my vintage '92 300EXC has provided me.
I am at a place now where nothing more needs to be done to it except periodic routine maintenance.
This is a good thing though because now I am able to just ride the KTM and relive some of my teenage years on that Penton Six Day that I had.
Speaking of that.
I was at my parents this weekend looking through some photographs of yesteryear and look what I discovered?

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1971 Penton Six Day 125


As for your question pertaining to a manual.
This is what I have on CD.
It covers a wide range of years and models.

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I found this link for you if you are interested in this.
Looks like this one is used but I doubt that there are any new ones left anymore.

Not all the 90's years parts are interchangeable.
You will have to cross reference the parts numbers to make sure they are the same and that can be painstakingly difficult at best, at least for me it has been.
Most of the KTM parts websites that I have visited do not show any listings for anything older than 1994.
And even then most of the 1994 OEM parts are not available anymore anyway.
Those few that are...well let's just say they cost a small fortune.
Used parts are really the best option and of course they are not always readily available.
I have purchased used parts off e-bay and at a local KTM motorcycle shop.
Owning a vintage KTM can be challenging, frustrating and unless you have unlimited financial means... costly.
I would suggest that you try to evaluate what is obvious that needs repair/replacement and then from that determine a general idea on cost and that may help you decide if this endeavor is worth it to you.
If it has been sitting for a while then be sure and check the waterpump as this is one of the most common issues (waterpump rot) with these old machines that have not been used for a long time.
Keep us posted on your progress.
There are many vintage enthusiasts like myself here on this forum.


Rangerman
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Blast from the past...

1976 Honda CB550Four

Our actual '76 550Four.

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Stock '76 550Four photo.

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I discovered another photo this time of our '76 550Four.
I really liked that bike!
No, I mean I really liked that bike!
But it did not start out that way.
We purchased it for a good price in good running condition.
At first when we saw it before buying it I must admit that I did not like it at all.
Being young I thought that it looked like an "old mans" motorcycle.
Because of the half fairing.
The sissy bar/back rack.
Crash bars with highway pegs? seriously?
And what really troubled me the most were the floorboards in lieu of the foot pegs!
Well I had pretty much made up my mind to pass on this one, that is until the owner fired it up.
Man, I must say that the one feature I totally missed but instantly started to change my mind about was the header pipes!
I cannot remember if they were genuine Kerker's or not?
But they had the most appealing sound.
While revving the engine.
And definitely while shifting through the gears at speed.
OK.
So I thought to myself.
That maybe this motorcycle was not so bad after all?
Maybe I could switch out that floorboard thingy back to foot pegs?
The backrest might in fact be comfortable after all?
Hauling a cooler for a picnic on the backrest sounds like a good idea.
The half fairing is there for a reason, right?
I might like not having to pick bugs out of my teeth anymore.
Or getting smacked in the face by them consistently.
And the bitter cold days when the wind cuts right through me, may now be somewhat non existent?
And I could always tidy it up a bit.
Yeah.
Clean it thoroughly with a toothbrush, every nook and cranny.
Polish the chrome.
How about repaint it?
Gloss black!
Maybe, just maybe this bike could be turned out of an "old mans" bike into a cool looking retro machine!
550. Check
Inline four. Check
Honda. Check
Nuff said.
Bought.
Paid in full.
We had a lot of fun on this CB.
Went a lot of places.
I actually liked the half fairing and the protection it afforded me.
The back rest proved in deed comfortable especially on the many longer rides we took.
The back rack soon earned its keep hauling sundry things securely besides our cooler.
The crash bars and highway peg combo...good idea.
As for the floor board thingys, I did eventually find them comfortable and the dual shifter complimented this nifty arrangement.
As for the Kerker's (or Kerker knock offs)...
I really liked them from the get go.
I guess all our different motorcycles stir special memories in us for different reasons.
Common to us all, it is.
Some just more special than others.
This was really the start of our two-up riding adventure that we are still enjoying even in this latter season of our life together here on this earth.
One of the first rides we took together two-up on this Honda remains one of the most memorable to this day for me.
An all day outing, summertime, covering most of the southern part of our state.
After so much time has passed and the years have gone fleetingly by, the experience of that beautiful summer day so many years ago on that 550Four almost seems surreal.
Life passes by quickly.
I am glad that we have been blessed with these good memories to reflect back on.
Simple times, simple pleasures...


Rangerman
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This is a good thing though because now I am able to just ride the KTM and relive some of my teenage years on that Penton Six Day that I had.
That is exactly what is driving me forward with this project, I can vividly remember all the fun I had on that bike.

Speaking of that.
I was at my parents this weekend looking through some photographs of yesteryear and look what I discovered?
Woah, THAT is a vintage bike if I've ever seen one, what happened to it?

As for your question pertaining to a manual.
This is what I have on CD.
It covers a wide range of years and models.
Thanks! That is just what I need, and the price seems reasonable.

Not all the 90's years parts are interchangeable.
You will have to cross reference the parts numbers to make sure they are the same and that can be painstakingly difficult at best, at least for me it has been.
Most of the KTM parts websites that I have visited do not show any listings for anything older than 1994.
And even then most of the 1994 OEM parts are not available anymore anyway.
Those few that are...well let's just say they cost a small fortune.
Used parts are really the best option and of course they are not always readily available.
I have purchased used parts off e-bay and at a local KTM motorcycle shop.
Owning a vintage KTM can be challenging, frustrating and unless you have unlimited financial means... costly.
I would suggest that you try to evaluate what is obvious that needs repair/replacement and then from that determine a general idea on cost and that may help you decide if this endeavor is worth it to you.
I have been checking lately for available OEM parts for my 1994 bike in sites like AOMC, KTMWorld, etc; and surprisingly have found most of them, but as you say, they cost a small fortune.

My current plan is splitting the engine and look at what can be salvaged, and what probably needs replacing.

As you can see by that little flag beside my name, I'm from a small country in South America called Ecuador, which means I'll have to import all the needed parts from the United States, but you know what? I'm pretty sure it's still going to be worth it, since I currently have no dirt bike to ride and the cheapest dirt bike here (Kawasaki KLX300r $5400 in the US) costs $9000, while the minimum wage is $340. 😂

I'll get the tools needed to do the job in a couple of weeks, and then we'll know for sure, I'll keep you guys posted.
 

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Woah, THAT is a vintage bike if I've ever seen one, what happened to it?
Interesting as to what happened to the 550four.
We rode that bike for about two years while we were dating before we were married and had so much fun on it that we decided to purchase this...

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A brand new (NOS) 1987 Honda Super Magna V-4 700!
We rode this for a short time.
A short time indeed.
But it was long enough for us to soon discover that although this was a really flashy (hot rod) of a motorcycle (and very faaassst too!).
It was not nearly as comfortable and dare I say just basically enjoyable as the vintage Honda 550Four had proven to be.
In fact it was through this disappointment that I realized I actually liked the 550Four much better and would have gladly welcomed in back in place of this new fancy machine that I now was in debt for.
Problem is that the bank did not want to buy it back.
I was never a big fan of cruiser type bikes, needless to say that as a result of that indifference I never even considered any big bulky cruisers as an option, and Harleys most definitely...not.
In fact if cruisers and sport bikes (crotch rockets) were the only two choices of motorcycles available...
I would choose the sport bikes without hesitation.
I am glad that scramblers, dual sport and adventure bikes exist since that is where my interest has always been.
Having my roots somewhat in dirt bikes has a lot to do with that.
The two stroke generation.
Well, now for the rest of the story...
Since we were not to thrilled with our most recent acquisition (Magna) coupled with the fact that I had prematurely sold the 550Four before making sure that the Magna would be adequate to replace it with.
We sold it for what we owed on it.
A very, very, very short time later, needless to say.

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Now what made this decision quite a bit easier was that we were expecting our first child soon and as a result our priorities changed immediately.
So much so that motorcycles no longer fit into the equation of our lives since our family took priority.
I had to work for a living (who would have guessed?) to provide for the young family God had given me and the potential risk involved with riding motorcycles was in fact a risk to big for me to take at that time.
I have stated before that I am a calculated risk taker, I am in fact this way and after calculating the risks of me not being able to provide for my family in the event of a debilitating accident or death, this was not a risk that I was willing to take, no sir.
I am a defensive, focused rider no doubt and can control that aspect of the motorcycle riding experience but the variable which has to be accounted for but cannot be controlled is in fact the others (cagers) that share the road, some more of a concern than others and they are that risk not worth taking.
At least not at that time, not in that season.
OK.
As a result of this motorcycles were not a part of my existence for roughly...
Twenty six years.
Until...


Rangerman
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