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One issue with lithium battery purchases is that some buyers go with the smallest battery they can, and then use foam inserts and such, to make the battery fit securely in the stock compartment. Smaller LiFEPo batteries typically have a similar CCA rating to the stock sized Lead/AGM batteries, so they are usually listed as suitable for use when cross referenced with the stock battery. But, the smaller LiFEPo batteries lack the amp-hour/Ah rating. The result is a LiFEPo battery that gives all of its Ah to just a few start up attempts, or drains too much due to accessories like aux lights, phone/gps charging, heated grips/gear, etc. When I shop for a LiFEPo, I look at the stock battery dimensions and polarity placement, then go for a physically same-sized LiFEPo battery with the most Ah I can find (CCA is generally high enough not to be a factor), and at a reasonable price. I also maintain them (occasionally) with a suitable charger. (Battery Tender Jr. Switchable, in my case). I've used WPS and BikeMaster LiFEPo batteries between my KTM, Ducati, Aprilia, and Honda, and never had an issue.
Is there any weight advantage to a lithium battery that's as large as the lead-acid it replaces?
 

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Is there any weight advantage to a lithium battery that's as large as the lead-acid it replaces?
Absolutely there is. Within ounces to that of using a smaller lithium battery.

For example, my CBR 1000 shows WPS HTZ7S-FP as the indicated battery to use, which is slightly smaller than the stock battery, but has the required 150 CCA. It also has only 2.7 Ah. The stock has 130 CCA and 6.4 Ah. Instead, I purchased the HTZ7S-FPP (notice the extra P), which is the exact size of the stock battery. The one I purchased has an Ah rating of 5.4 (closer to stock), and a whopping 240 CCA. The weight difference between the 2 was half a pound, but still 3 pounds lighter than stock. So the trade off of 8 ounces was well worth it. Fires right up every time, and can handle a load even at low RPM, when the bikes charging cycle isn't producing much.
 

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My local shop suggested a tip for starting in the cold. First turn the bike on. Then tap the starter and release it before the bike can start. Then turn the bike off for 30 seconds. Turn the bike on and start it normally. I have tried it all week and it works pretty well. Try it!
Thanks for the tip! I haven't had an issue, yet we were in 23-degree weather. My 2019 KTM 500 EXC F started 1st time!
 

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2016 1190 Adv, 2020 890 DukeR, 2008 Buell 1125R
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My local shop suggested a tip for starting in the cold. First turn the bike on. Then tap the starter and release it before the bike can start. Then turn the bike off for 30 seconds. Turn the bike on and start it normally. I have tried it all week and it works pretty well. Try it!
That's pretty common. In cold weather the batteries need to warm up a touch. Turning on the accessories and keeping the headlight on for a bit do the same.

Thanks for the tip.
I have a shorai in my buell. Immediate reduction of about 8lbs higher up on the bike.
 
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